TribLIVE

| Sports

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Olympic medalist Liukin visits Pittsburgh to promote U.S. gymnastics championships

Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review - Olympic gold medal gymnast Nastia Liukin visits with students at X-Cel Gymnastics on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, during a stop at the school in Cranberry.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Christopher Horner  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Olympic gold medal gymnast Nastia Liukin visits with students at X-Cel Gymnastics on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, during a stop at the school in Cranberry.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review - Olympic gold medal gymnast Nastia Liukin poses for a photo with students at X-Cel Gymnastics on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, during a stop at the school in Cranberry.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Christopher Horner  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Olympic gold medal gymnast Nastia Liukin poses for a photo with students at X-Cel Gymnastics on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, during a stop at the school in Cranberry.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review - Olympic gold medal gymnast Nastia Liukin talks with students at X-CEL Gymnastics Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, during a visit to the school in Cranberry.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Christopher Horner  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Olympic gold medal gymnast Nastia Liukin talks with students at X-CEL Gymnastics Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, during a visit to the school in Cranberry.

TribLIVE Sports Videos

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014, 7:36 p.m.
 

Olympic gold medalist Nastia Liukin retired from competitive gymnastics at 22, which might sound young until you know this: She retired as a 20-year veteran.

Liukin, who took up gymnastics as a 2-year-old, is traveling the U.S. promoting the sport, including the 2014 P&G Gymnastics Championships that will be Aug. 21-24 at Consol Energy Center. It's the first time the event that crowns the nation's best gymnasts — men, women, juniors and seniors — will be in Pittsburgh.

Ticket sales have been brisk, she said, for fans wanting to get a glimpse of the U.S. team that will compete at the world championships later this year.

Wednesday was an especially busy day for Liukin, 24. She visited young gymnasts in Charlotte, N.C., in the morning before traveling to X-Cel Gymnastics in Cranberry and Jewart's Gymnastics in Hampton by nightfall and riding the Zamboni at Wednesday night's Penguins game.

In Cranberry, X-Cel owners estimated she signed about 500 autographs.

Born in Moscow and raised in Dallas, Liukin will return to her native land next month for the Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, where she will do lifestyle features for NBC.

“I'll be giving fans an inside look at being at the Olympic Games, exploring the city,” Liukin said.

“Not just interviews with athletes but more hands-on, maybe getting on skates.”

After that, the NYU sophomore, who is majoring in sports management, plans to travel to Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Olympics where she will be part of the NBC-TV commentating team, this time focusing on gymnastics.

Both Olympics promise to be less taxing than the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, where she tied a U.S. gymnastics record held by Mary Lou Retton and Shannon Miller by earning five medals (one gold, three silver, one bronze).

“I achieved what I wanted to in gymnastics,” she said. “I left with no regrets. I don't really necessarily feel I left the sport. I just kind of chaged roles.

“At a point, your body has kind of had enough.

Jerry DiPaola is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at jdipaola@tribweb.com or via Twitter @JDiPaola_Trib.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Steelers RB Archer trying to catch up after tough rookie season
  2. Steelers LB Timmons has grown into leadership role on defense
  3. Pirates third baseman Ramirez’s last ride is about winning a ring
  4. Steelers notebook: Backup QB Gradkowski remains out with shoulder issue
  5. Consol takes $603 million loss in second quarter
  6. Rising East Liberty out of reach for Pittsburgh’s poor
  7. Former Cal U football player cleared of assault charges sues university, police, prosecutor
  8. Dollars and sense: High cost of child care keeps many out of work force
  9. NATO holding rare emergency meeting at Turkey’s request
  10. Medical pot has advocate in Pennsylvania House
  11. Pa. House speaker says overriding Wolf’s budget veto ‘an option’