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U.S. team settles for 2-2 draw with Portugal at World Cup

| Sunday, June 22, 2014, 10:39 p.m.
United States' Clint Dempsey, left, celebrates scoring his side's second goal during the group G World Cup soccer match between the USA and Portugal at the Arena da Amazonia in Manaus, Brazil, Sunday, June 22, 2014.

MANAUS, Brazil — With Cristiano Ronaldo on the field, a one-goal lead is never safe.

The world player of the year rarely sparkled on a hot, humid night, but his stoppage-time cross set up Silvestre Varela for the tying goal Sunday in Portugal's 2-2 draw against the United States at the World Cup.

The Real Madrid winger, who has been playing despite a left knee injury, showed flashes of his best, but his impact was minimal until the final seconds of the match. He curled the ball in to a diving Varela, who headed past Tim Howard to give the Portuguese team a slim hope of advancing to the second round and deny the Americans instant advancement.

“He made a great cross,” said Howard, Ronaldo's former teammate from their days at Manchester United. “Football's cruel sometimes.”

The United States has four points in Group G, the same as Germany. Portugal and Ghana have one point each. The Americans will face Germany on Thursday in Recife, while Portugal takes on Ghana at the same time in Brasilia.

“Obviously we're disappointed, but at the end of the day, you've got to look at the positives. We got a point,” said United States captain Clint Dempsey, who scored to give the Americans a 2-1 lead in the 81st. “It's going down to the last game, and hopefully, we get the job done.”

Nani scored first for Portugal, shooting past a sprawling Howard in the fifth minute. But the Americans responded in the second half as Portugal seemed to wilt in the stifling heat.

Jermaine Jones made it 1-1 with a curling shot in the 64th after a cross from Graham Zusi made its way through Portugal's defense. And Dempsey, playing with a broken nose, then put the Americans ahead, using his stomach to direct the ball into the net from a cross by Zusi.

“Now we have to go out and beat Germany, that's what we have to do,” U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann said. “We have to play Germany, we have one less day to recover, we played in the Amazon, they played on a place with less travel. We have to do it the tough way.”

Dempsey's goal was his fourth at a World Cup and second at this year's tournament. Jones scored his third goal for the United States national team and first in almost two years.

It was all Portugal for much of the first half, with Ronaldo in the starting lineup but getting less involved as the match progressed. The Americans, however, started to get more and more chances and had a shot from Michael Bradley cleared off the line by Ricardo Costa in the 55th.

“There didn't seem to be any problem with Cristiano Ronaldo,” Portugal coach Paulo Bento said. “What happened during the game has something to do with our other players.”

In the 39th minute, referee Nestor Pitana of Argentina called for a cooling break, the first such decision to be taken at this World Cup.

At the start of the match, FIFA listed the temperature at 86 degrees with 66 percent humidity.

“It was a thriller,” Klinsmann said. “Everybody who had a chance to be today in Manaus will talk about this game for a long time.”

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