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NFL

NFL: Message being lost in political firestorm over anthem

| Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017, 1:48 p.m.
In this Sept. 10, 2017, file photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) kneels during the national anthem in front of teammates before an NFL football game against the and the Carolina Panthers in Santa Clara, Calif. The NFL says the message players and teams are trying to express is being lost in a political firestorm. NFL spokesman Joe Lockhart said Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017, that it is important for 'everyone to understand what they are talking about, to not see everything in terms of who is up or down politically.'
In this Sept. 10, 2017, file photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) kneels during the national anthem in front of teammates before an NFL football game against the and the Carolina Panthers in Santa Clara, Calif. The NFL says the message players and teams are trying to express is being lost in a political firestorm. NFL spokesman Joe Lockhart said Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017, that it is important for 'everyone to understand what they are talking about, to not see everything in terms of who is up or down politically.'

NEW YORK — The NFL says the message players and teams are trying to express is being lost in a political firestorm.

The issues have been “overtaken by political forces,” NFL spokesman Joe Lockhart said Thursday, referring to President Trump's criticism of the league, team owners and players for kneeling during the national anthem.

More than 200 players either knelt or used other means as expressions of unity last weekend. Lockhart said such actions are not a protest against the anthem or the flag.

“One of the impacts is to distort the views of the NFL and particularly our players,” Lockhart said.

Along with the players who knelt last weekend, full teams, along with some team owners, linked arms either before or during the anthem. Three teams — Pittsburgh, Seattle and Tennessee — did not take the field until after the anthem.

“They are under attack now and the (original) lesson has been forgotten,” Lockhart said. “It is important for everyone to understand what they are talking about, to not see everything in terms of who is up or down politically.

“The NFL players are men of character, many of whom are leaders in their community. They are patriotic, support the military. ... They understand their platform can be used to make the country a better place.”

Lockhart insisted there will be no “leaguewide directive” for future demonstrations.

“This is an issue that should involve the owners of the 32 clubs, the coaches and players to work out together,” he said. “There is very regular dialogue going on between the players, coaches and owners. This is an issue that has sort of gripped the headlines. We all care very deeply about this.

“All of our owners don't always agree with even each other, and the players often have a position at odds with the league, and we work hard to resolve those,” he added. “We have been united on this issue. They are all pulling in the same direction, but we understand each locker room is different.”

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