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Patriots' James Harrison says he won't be watching Steelers play Jaguars

Frank Carnevale
| Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, 1:00 p.m.

James Harrison says he won't be watching today's Steelers game against the Jacksonville Jaguars.

The former Steelers linebacker signed with the New England Patriots on week 16, and hasn't shared much love for the team he played with for 14 seasons.

After Saturday night's game with his new team, Harrison was asked whether he would be watching today's Steelers Jags game.

"I don't even know when they play," Harrison said. The game kicks off at 1:05 p.m. at Heinz Field.

Instead he said he'll be working out or watching cartoons. In a video from the locker room when he was asked about the Steelers divisional game, he said he'll be doing "leg day." Later in the video he added that he doesn't watch sports, instead he's a "cartoon guy."

According to The Washington Post , Harrison added he won't know the winner of the game until he returns to Gillette Stadium on Monday for work.

His reasoning: it's a job.

"I don't pay attention to sports," Harrison said, according to The Washington Post. "If my kid is not playing, I'm not watching. If it's not film studying, I'm not watching. This is my job. I like to get away from my job."

The winner of Sunday's game will advance to the AFC Championship game next Sunday in Foxborough. Kickoff for that game is 3:05 p.m.

The Patriots dispatched the Tennessee Titans on Saturday night, 35-14. Harrison played 30 out of 67 defensive snaps, and did not record a sack, but did help contain quarterback Marcus Mariota and running back Derrick Henry.

A Steelers' trip to the AFC Championship game could provide plenty of opportunity for Harrison to watch his old team.

Wide receiver Erick Decker of the Tennessee Titans carries the ball after a catch as he is defended by James Harrison of the New England Patriots in the second quarter of the AFC Divisional Playoff game at Gillette Stadium on January 13, 2018 in Foxborough, Mass.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Wide receiver Erick Decker of the Tennessee Titans carries the ball after a catch as he is defended by James Harrison of the New England Patriots in the second quarter of the AFC Divisional Playoff game at Gillette Stadium on January 13, 2018 in Foxborough, Mass. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Wide receiver Erick Decker of the Tennessee Titans carries the ball after a catch as he is defended by James Harrison of the New England Patriots in the second quarter of the AFC Divisional Playoff game at Gillette Stadium on January 13, 2018 in Foxborough, Mass.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Wide receiver Erick Decker of the Tennessee Titans carries the ball after a catch as he is defended by James Harrison of the New England Patriots in the second quarter of the AFC Divisional Playoff game at Gillette Stadium on January 13, 2018 in Foxborough, Mass. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
New England Patriots linebacker James Harrison runs during an NFL football team practice Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots signed the 39-year-old, five-time Pro Bowl linebacker after he was released Saturday by the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Patriots host the New York Jets in the final regular season game on Sunday. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)
New England Patriots linebacker James Harrison runs during an NFL football team practice Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots signed the 39-year-old, five-time Pro Bowl linebacker after he was released Saturday by the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Patriots host the New York Jets in the final regular season game on Sunday. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)
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