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NFL

Redskins, Seahawks rally behind rookies

| Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013, 6:40 p.m.

WASHINGTON — How convenient. Those who can't decide between Robert Griffin III and Russell Wilson are literally getting a playoff.

RG3 or RW3? They've only had two of the best two rookie seasons for quarterbacks in NFL history, according to the numbers. Time to compare and contrast as much as possible Sunday as Griffin's Washington Redskins host Wilson's Seattle Seahawks in the NFC's wild-card round.

“I don't play against quarterbacks. It's not my job to compare us,” Griffin told reporters this week. “You guys will do that. ... I hope you guys have fun.”

Hey, Redskins Pro Bowl left tackle Trent Williams, why is your guy better than theirs?

“I definitely would take his hair over Russell Wilson's hair,” Williams said. “He's taller. He has a couple of more endorsements than Russell does. That gives you grounds enough to take RG3 over Wilson. Way cooler TV commercials.”

Griffin is charisma personified, always ready with a humorous quip and the ready-made sound bite. Wilson can be engaging but often speaks in clichés. Or, as he put it: “I'm not about flash.”

Griffin crashed coach Mike Shanahan's news conference Wednesday, asking the coach how he spent his New Year's. It's hard to imagine Pete Carroll getting the same shtick from Wilson.

“He's always serious, even when we're not supposed to be serious,” Seahawks fullback Michael Robinson said. “He's always serious. That's a good thing. But I don't know, man, he's always working. It's hard to pinpoint his personality.”

Sunday's game will be the second in NFL playoff history with two starting rookie quarterbacks, but this is a case where both the winner and loser are expected to prosper.

“Even though they have totally different styles in how they carry themselves,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said, “in the core, they're really the real deal.”

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