Share This Page
NFL

NFL notebook: Marino admits fathering child with CBS employee

| Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, 3:14 p.m.
Dan Marino

NFL Hall of Fame quarterback and CBS analyst Dan Marino fathered a child out of wedlock with another CBS employee in 2005.

The New York Post reported that the former Central Catholic and Pitt star had an affair with former CBS Sports production assistant Donna Savattere, and the two had a daughter, Chloe, in June 2005.

“This is a personal and private matter. I take full responsibility both personally and financially for my actions now as I did then,” Marino said in a statement. “We mutually agreed to keep our arrangement private to protect all parties involved.”

CBS Sports spokeswoman Jen Sabatelle told USA Today: “Dan has said all there is to say on this matter. and he'll be in his usual role on our broadcast Super Bowl Sunday.”

Marino has been married for 28 years to his wife, Claire, with whom he has four sons and two adopted daughters.

“My wife and I have been married for almost 30 years and have six children together,” Marino said. “And we continue to be a strong and loving family.”

After the birth of Chloe, the Post reports Marino “agreed to pay millions,” and Savattere moved from New York to Texas to keep their relationship and child a secret.

Donald Driver is retiring, with a formal announcement planned next week for the Packers' all-time leading receiver. In a statement, Driver said he's always enjoyed a “special bond” with Packers fans and “can think of no better way to retire than to celebrate with them and the Packers organization.” The 38-year-old officially will retire Feb. 6 at the Lambeau Field Atrium. Driver finishes as the Packers' all-time leader in yards receiving (10,137 yards) and catches (743) and is third behind Don Hutson and Sterling Sharpe with 61 touchdown receptions. He had seven 1,000-yard seasons, also a Packers record for a receiver.

Drew Brees is ready to move on from the bitterness of the bounty scandal, which may have undermined his team's chances of playing for a title on its home field. “We're professionals and we've moved past that in the sense that there's nothing that can be done other than, ‘Let's move on, and let's find a way to be better next year in spite of it,'” Brees said. “It would be easy to sit here and be angry, but it is what it is.”

— AP

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.