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NFL notebook: Falcons in line to get new $1 billion stadium

| Friday, March 8, 2013, 1:18 a.m.

Financing terms have been reached for the Falcons' proposal to build a new $1 billion stadium, keeping the team's home games in the city's downtown, officials announced Thursday. The city council must now vote on the proposal.

The public contribution to stadium construction through hotel-motel tax revenue will be capped at $200 million and the Falcons will pay $800 million, said Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed. He made the announcement with Falcons owner Arthur Blank and Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal.

The Georgia World Congress Center Authority, which owns the Georgia Dome, would also own the new stadium.

Dumervil asked to take pay cut

The Broncos are asking defensive end Elvis Dumervil to take a pay cut so they can create more salary cap room for free agency.

Dumervil signed a six-year, $61.5 million contract in 2010. He's scheduled to make $12 million in 2013.

The team wants him to take a cut or restructure his contract, according to a person familiar with the situation, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because details of the negotiations were not public.

Around the league

Titans agreed to terms with kicker Rob Bironas. ... The Bengals agreed to a two-year deal with running back Cedric Peerman. ... Jeff Saturday retired as an Colts player and immediately started in the team's marketing and community relations department. ... The Chargers released linebacker Takeo Spikes.

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