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NFL notebook: Falcons add RB Jackson from Rams

| Thursday, March 14, 2013, 7:57 p.m.
REUTERS
Rams running back Steven Jackson carries the ball against the Vikings during the second half Sunday, Dec. 16, 2012. Jackson signed with the Atlanta Falcons on Thursday.

The Falcons found their replacement for Michael Turner on Thursday by agreeing to terms with Steven Jackson, considered the top free-agent running back, on a three-year, $12 million deal.

The 30-year-old Jackson had 1,042 yards rushing and four touchdowns with the Rams last season. It was his eighth straight season with more than 1,000 yards rushing.

Jackson's 10,135 yards rushing for his career are the most of any active player. He set career highs with 1,528 yards rushing and 13 touchdowns with St. Louis in 2006.

Jackson averaged 4.1 yards per carry with the Rams and gives Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan another receiver to target. Jackson had at least 38 catches in each of his last eight seasons in St. Louis.

Tuck rule sacked?

The tuck rule could disappear from NFL games if owners approve a proposal from the competition committee to dump it.

The owners also will consider a change to instant replay rules allowing for a video review even when a coach makes an illegal challenge. The league meetings are next week in Phoenix.

If a passer is in the act of bringing the ball down into his body rather than throwing it and loses control, it has been ruled an incomplete pass under the tuck rule. The proposal would make it a fumble.

N.Y. AG: Investigate questions about sexual orientation

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has urged the NFL to investigate whether possible draft picks were improperly asked about their sexual orientation during the league's combine, which he said would be illegal in New York.

“We ask that the league immediately issue a statement that any form of discrimination or harassment on the basis of sexual orientation by league teams or players against potential recruits or players constitutes a violation of state, local and, in some cases, contractor law and will not be tolerated,” Schneiderman said in a letter dated Thursday and released to news organizations.

Schneiderman asked NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to call him by next Wednesday to schedule a meeting on the matter.

Seahawks land DE

Michael Bennett was in Miami on Thursday visiting the Dolphins. Had he left there without a deal, he was scheduled to go to the Detroit Lions. And the Tampa Bay Buccaneers were still in play.

By Thursday evening, out of nowhere, he had joined the Seattle Seahawks.

The former Bucs defensive end agreed to a one-year, $5 million deal, according to a person informed of the details of the contract to be signed.

Texans courting Reed

The Texans said free agent safety Ed Reed was picked up in by general manager Rick Smith in the private jet of Texans owner Bob McNair. The move was tweeted by the team for all the world to see, and then Texans defensive coordinator Wade Phillips tweeted that he was meeting with the Ravens veteran in his office, too.

Signing Reed would make up for an otherwise disappointing week for Houston. The Texans cut receiver Kevin Walter, then lost tight end James Casey to Philadelphia and safety Glover Quin to Detroit after the opening of the free agency signing period.

Cassel cut, signed by Vikes

Matt Cassel's rocky career in Kansas City came to an abrupt ending when the Chiefs released their former starting quarterback with two years left on his contract.

Hours later, Cassel reached an agreement to join the Minnesota Vikings as the backup for Christian Ponder, according to a person with knowledge of the deal who spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal had not been announced.

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