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NFL notebook: Report: QB Kolb in talks with Bills

| Saturday, March 30, 2013, 9:36 p.m.

BUFFALO, N.Y. — The quarterback-needy Buffalo Bills have turned their attention to free-agent Kevin Kolb.

A person familiar with talks said Saturday night that the Bills are close to completing a deal to sign the sixth-year player. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of discussions.

Kolb spent the past two seasons in Arizona, where injuries hampered his opportunity to prove himself as a starter. The Cardinals were left with little choice but to release Kolb on March 15 in a move that came before they were set to pay the player a $2 million roster bonus and saved the team about $7 million in salary cap space.

The Bills are in no position to be choosy. They're down to one experienced quarterback on their roster — Tarvaris Jackson — after releasing returning starter Ryan Fitzpatrick earlier this month.

Last season, Kolb helped the Cardinals get off to a 4-0 start before being sidelined for the rest of the season with torn rib cartilage.

CB Grimes signs with Dolphins

Cornerback Brent Grimes, who missed almost all of last season with an Achilles tendon injury, signed a one-year contract with the Dolphins.

Grimes started 28 games for the Atlanta Falcons in 2010-11 but was hurt in their opener last year. He declined to predict whether he'll be able to take part in offseason practices beginning in May.

Grimes is expected to start for the Dolphins, who lost Sean Smith via free agency to the Kansas City Chiefs.

“I picked Miami because I think they are building something great here, and I would love to be a part of it,” Grimes said.

Around the league

The Cardinals have some interest in Carson Palmer, but they will deal for the Raiders' quarterback “only if it doesn't cost them much,” according to an Arizona Republic report. ... Defensive tackle Derek Landri, who started seven games last season for the Eagles, agreed to a contract with the Buccaneers, according to an NFL.com report. ... Pro football Hall of Famer and Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Alan Page has written a children's book about his odd pinky, a finger that's permanently bent outward at a 90-degree angle.

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