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Police search around home of Patriots' star Hernandez for 2nd day

| Wednesday, June 19, 2013, 7:54 p.m.
Massachusetts State Police search along a road near the home of Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez in North Attleborough, Mass., Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Police spent a second day at Hernandez' home Wednesday, two days after a body was found about a mile away.

NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH, Mass. — State police returned to the home of New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez on Wednesday, two days after a body was found about a mile away.

Two troopers knocked on the door of Hernandez's sprawling house in an upscale subdivision Wednesday morning, but no one answered. The night before, police spent hours there as another group of officers searched an industrial park where the body was found Monday.

The man was a semi-pro football player with connections to Hernandez, his family said Wednesday. Ursula Ward said police told her the body was that of her son, Odin Lloyd, who played for the Boston Bandits.

Sports Illustrated, citing an unidentified source, reported that Hernandez was not believed to be a suspect in what was being treated as a possible homicide. The magazine said police had spoken with Hernandez.

Sports Illustrated reported the link between Hernandez and the case was a rented Chevrolet Suburban with Rhode Island plates that police had been searching for. The Associated Press could not independently confirm the report.

“It has been widely reported in the media that the state police have searched the home of our client, Aaron Hernandez, as part of an ongoing investigation,” Hernandez attorney Michael Fee said in a statement. “Out of respect for that process, neither we nor Aaron will have any comment about the substance of that investigation until it has come to a conclusion.”

Later Wednesday, at least seven state troopers searched both sides of a road just off the street where Hernandez lives.

“I am aware of the reports, but I do not anticipate that we will be commenting publicly during an ongoing police investigation,” Patriots spokesman Stacey James said.

Now Hernandez reportedly will be facing a lawsuit stemming from a February incident where he allegedly shot a man in the face, according to TMZ. Sports Illustrated also confirmed the existence of the lawsuit. According to TMZ, the man filing the lawsuit, Alexander Bradley, claims he went to a club in Miami with Hernandez on Feb. 13, and at some point, an argument broke out between the men.

Hernandez and Bradley left the club in the same car, where the argument continued. At some point during the car ride, Hernandez allegedly aimed a gun at Bradley and the gun discharged, hitting Bradley in the face, according to the report.

Hernandez returned home during the afternoon Wednesday. He did not speak to a crowd of media.

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