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NFL

Ogden, Allen kick off Pro Football Hall of Fame induction

| Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, 9:27 p.m.
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Baltimore Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome (left) presents Jonathan Ogden with his Hall of Fame bust during the Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, in Canton, Ohio.

CANTON, Ohio — Forcefully and emotionally, Cris Carter summed up the 50th induction ceremony for the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday night.

The seventh and final inductee from the Class of 2013, Carter honored dozens of people in his life who were “going into the Hall of Fame with me tonight,” as he followed Jonathan Ogden, former Penn State linebacker Dave Robinson, Larry Allen, Bill Parcells, Curley Culp and Warren Sapp in being inducted.

More than 120 hall members, a record, returned for the 50th anniversary celebration of the shrine.

“I appreciate the process you have to go through to get to be a Hall of Famer,” said Carter, who had perhaps the best hands of any receiver the NFL has seen. “To be able to join these men on this stage in football heaven is the greatest day of my life.”

Carter needed six tries to make the hall even though he retired as the No. 2 career receiver behind Jerry Rice. He choked back tears as he made his speech after being presented by his son, Duron, and he spoke of his problems with alcohol while playing three years for the Eagles before being released.

He hooked on immediately with the Vikings and hooked onto nearly everything throw his way: Carter finished his 16-season career with 1,101 catches for 13,899 yards and 130 touchdowns.

“This game gave me identity, gave me a sense of purpose,” he said.

Parcells also seemingly spoke for everyone in the Hall of Fame, and all the people gathered Saturday night.

“There's a kinship created that lasts for the rest of your life,” he said about his experience as one of the NFL's most successful coaches.

As relaxed as if he had no one to block, Ogden became the first Baltimore Raven enshrined in the hall.

“Talent isn't enough,” Ogden said. “A lot of people have talent, they don't always live up to it. For me it is about maximizing, striving for perfection.

Allen, who sniffled his way through his speech, was just as dominating a blocker as Ogden. He also was, he said, NFL's strongest man, once bench-pressing 700 pounds, and saying “I did it naturally.”

Sapp became only the second Tampa Bay Buccaneer to be enshrined, 18 years after Lee Roy Selmon made it.

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