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NFL notebook: Fans escape serious injury after Indy rail collapse

| Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013, 8:36 p.m.

• Two fans appear to have escaped serious injury after a railing collapse just after Sunday's game ended in Indianapolis. The unidentified fans were injured when the barrier they were leaning against gave way just above the tunnel leading to Oakland's locker room. They fell hard onto the walkway. One fan was taken away on a stretcher, while another, witnesses said, left in a wheelchair. About three hours after the Colts beat Oakland, 21-17, in the season opener, Barney Levengood, executive director of the Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil Stadium, said one person was released after receiving medical attention at the stadium. The other person, Levengood said, was treated at the stadium and transported to Methodist Hospital for additional evaluation.

• Panthers reserve defensive end Frank Alexander was ejected after throwing a punch at Seahawks offensive lineman Breno Giacomini during Sunday's game. Alexander's mental blunder came late in the second quarter and wiped out a sack for a 13-yard loss by safety Charles Godfrey.

• Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles left the season opener against Jacksonville with a quadriceps injury. Charles returned for two carries, but then headed to the sideline for good in the fourth quarter. Charles was injured in the third period when he got sandwiched on a tackle between Jaguars linebackers Geno Hayes and Paul Posluszny.

• Running back LaMichael James was among San Francisco's inactive players for the season opener with Green Bay as he nurses a knee injury. James was expected to be sidelined after he missed practices. Wideout Jon Baldwin (Pitt) also was inactive for the 49ers, along with fellow new wide receiver Chris Harper.

— AP

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