Share This Page
NFL

NFL notebook: Raiders coach's gesture could draw fine from NFL

| Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, 9:24 p.m.

Oakland Raiders defensive coordinator Jason Tarver could be facing a fine from the NFL for an obscene gesture directed at the officials.

Tarver was caught on television using the one-finger gesture toward the officials after a flag was thrown on cornerback Mike Jenkins for a hit to the head of Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell in Sunday's 21-18 win.

“I apologize for my action on the sideline of yesterday's game,” Tarver said in a statement. “It was in the heat of the moment, and I regret drawing attention away from the Raiders players and what they accomplished.”

The flag was eventually picked up but that may not spare Tarver from punishment.

The NFL said Monday a decision on any fine would be announced Friday.

Tennessee defensive coordinator Chuck Cecil was fined $40,000 for a similar gesture in 2010.

Cardinals GM: Fitzgerald stays put

With the trade deadline looming, it was inevitable that rumors of wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald leaving the Arizona Cardinals would start to surface.

General manager Steve Keim dismissed the rumors on Sunday night and again Monday morning.

“Did you hear them chanting, “Larry! Larry! Larry!” Keim asked. “Yeah, like I'm going to trade him. The fans would kill me. They'd be waiting for me in the trees of my neighborhood.”

Jets WR disputes ‘Pacman' claim

New York Jets wide receiver David Nelson denies the claim he's a “dirty” player made by Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Adam “Pacman” Jones, saying that's “inaccurate and untrue.”

Nelson and Jones had a few tense moments during the Bengals' 49-9 victory Sunday, including a hit by the Jets receiver late in the third quarter that angered the cornerback. Nelson was penalized for clipping, and an angry Jones had to be restrained as he ran toward him.

Jones told the Bengals' website that Nelson was “playing dirty,” and said there were three “cheap shots” in the game. The Daily News also reported that Jones told Nelson he would find out where he lives “and come and get you.”

Nelson wouldn't detail his conversations with Jones, but confirmed that published reports were accurate.

Titans owner Adams remembered

Tennessee Titans owner Bud Adams was remembered as a competitive visionary who helped cultivate the National Football League as a founding member of the old American Football League.

About 1,000 friends, relatives and associates of Adams attended a memorial service Monday in his adopted hometown of Houston.

The Oklahoma-born Adams died last week at age 90.

He's best remembered for bringing pro football to Houston when he and partner Lamar Hunt announced in 1959 the formation of the upstart AFL.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.