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NFL notebook: Chargers-Bengals game 1st to be blacked out

| Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013, 9:18 p.m.

• The first NFL game to be blacked out locally this season will be Sunday's matchup between the AFC North-leading Cincinnati Bengals and the San Diego Chargers. The Chargers say more than 5,300 tickets were still unsold at Thursday's deadline, meaning the game won't be televised in Southern California. The Chargers had four blackouts last season, including a loss to the Bengals.

• The NFL has announced the dates of its three regular-season games in London next year, with the Dallas Cowboys playing the Jacksonville Jaguars in Week 10 on Nov. 9. The first game will be played in Week 4 on Sept. 28, with the Oakland Raiders facing the Miami Dolphins. A month later, in Week 8, the Atlanta Falcons will play the Detroit Lions on Oct. 26. All the games will be played at Wembley Stadium. The NFL has been playing regular-season games at Wembley since 2007.

• John Fox is returning to work on Monday, less than a month after undergoing open-heart surgery, and he plans to coach the Denver Broncos in their game against the Tennessee Titans on Dec. 8. What hasn't been determined is whether Fox will coach from the sideline or the booth. Fox Sports first reported Fox's impending return.

• Raiders right guard Mike Brisiel left Thursday's game against Dallas after injuring his knee on Oakland's first offensive play. Brisiel stayed down for a couple of minutes after the play, though he walked off the field without any help. But the team later said he wouldn't return without providing additional specifics about his injury. The guard also left the game at Houston on Nov. 17 with a knee injury. He was cleared after an MRI the following day.

— AP

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