Share This Page
NFL

NFL notebook: Romo's season over after back surgery

| Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, 11:33 p.m.

Tony Romo's season is over, and the Cowboys will have to win without their star quarterback in a third straight playoffs-or-bust finale. Coach Jason Garrett said Romo had back surgery Friday, and Kyle Orton will start when Dallas faces Philadelphia on Sunday night with the NFC East title on the line. Dallas linebacker Sean Lee (Upper St. Clair, Penn State) will miss his third straight game with a sprained neck.

• Less than three years after being one of the most prized free agents on the market, Nnamdi Asomugha's NFL career is over. Asomugha announced his retirement at the Raiders' headquarters, ending his 11-year career at the place he had his most success.

Walter Thurmond is returning from his four-game suspension just in time to join the Seattle Seahawks for the postseason. Thurmond was suspended in November for violating the league's substance-abuse policy. Byron Maxwell has started with Thurmond out and will be Seattle's starter Sunday against St. Louis.

• Buccaneers safety Dashon Goldson was fined $60,000 by the NFL for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Rams receiver Stedman Bailey last Sunday. St. Louis linebacker Jo-Lonn Dunbar was fined $21,000 for a helmet-to-helmet hit. Jets defensive lineman Sheldon Richardson was docked $15,750 for roughing the passer. Buffalo receiver Robert Woods was fined $15,750 for punching Miami safety Reshad Jones.

• Bills rookie quarterback EJ Manuel won't start the season finale at New England because of a small tear in a left knee ligament that will not require surgery. Backup Thad Lewis will start. ... The Bears announced a four-year extension with Robbie Gould, locking in one of the most accurate kickers in NFL history through the 2017 season. ... Adrian Peterson is doubtful for the final regular-season game against the Lions.

— AP

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.