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NFL

Judge: $765M might not cover NFL concussion claims

| Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, 8:12 p.m.

PHILADELPHIA — A federal judge is slowing down the proposed $765 million settlement of NFL concussion claims, questioning if there's enough money to cover 20,000 retired players.

U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody denied preliminary approval of the plan Tuesday because she's worried the money could run out sooner than expected. She also raised concerns that anyone who gets concussion damages from the NFL would be barred from suing the NCAA or other amateur football leagues.

“I am primarily concerned that not all retired NFL football players who ultimately receive a qualifying diagnosis or their (families) ... will be paid,” the judge wrote.

The proposed settlement, negotiated over several months, is designed to last at least 65 years.

The awards would vary based on an ex-player's age and diagnosis. A younger retiree with Lou Gehrig's disease would get $5 million, those with serious dementia cases would get $3 million and an 80-year-old with early dementia would get $25,000. Retirees without symptoms would get baseline screening and follow-up care if needed.

Law professor Gabe Feldman, who directs the sports law program at Tulane University Law School, called the ruling a setback but said “there's no reason to panic.”

“The question remains whether this gives pause to some of the retired players and makes them question whether this is a settlement they want to be a part of,” he said.

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