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NFL

AFC teams vying for championship overcome obstacles

| Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Embarrassing headlines. Sidelined superstars. Retooled offenses. Shredded defenses. It's a wonder the New England Patriots and Denver Broncos made it this far.

Bill Belichick's smarts and Tom Brady's tenacity always seems to trump tribulation.

This season, they brushed aside the Tim Tebow distraction and overcame Aaron Hernandez's arrest and the losses of Rob Gronkowski, Wes Welker, Vince Wilfork and Jerod Mayo to put the Patriots (13-4) into the AFC Championship for the third straight year.

“I'm sure every team is probably at this point overcome a lot,” Brady said. “I know Denver has done a lot of those things, too. They've overcome a lot of things and injuries and so forth. It's just part of the NFL football season.

“To get out there and play 16 weeks and really see where you stand at the end of those 16 weeks, getting to the playoffs, play the best teams and see if you can advance. It's certainly not easy to do. It's very challenging.”

Nobody does it better than Brady and Belichick, the best quarterback/coach combo in history with a record 18 playoff wins.

After last year's stumble against Baltimore in the playoffs, John Fox and Peyton Manning also steered the Broncos (14-3) through a minefield to send Denver to its first conference championship in eight years.

“That shock of what happened against the Ravens contributed to this team being able to be as flexible as it has been and survive the adversity that it's gone through,” said Hall of Fame quarterback John Elway, who led the Broncos to back-to-back Super Bowls in the late 1990s and now leads them from the front office instead of the huddle.

After losing Elvis Dumervil in the infamous fax fiasco when his renegotiated contract didn't reach team headquarters in time, Elway hit the jackpot in free agency by signing Welker and Louis Vasquez on offense and Shaun Phillips, Terrance Knighton and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie on defense.

They helped the Broncos weather an injury epidemic that claimed Von Miller, Kevin Vickerson, Rahim Moore, Derek Wolfe and Chris Harris while rendering captains Champ Bailey and Wesley Woodyard backups for most of the season.

Fox overcame his own heart operation that sidelined him for a month and Manning set a slew of records, including throwing for 55 TDs and 5,447 yards, to help the Broncos become the first 600-point team in league history.

The Broncos did it despite losing exceptional blindside protector Ryan Clady in Week 2 and being anchored by a converted guard who hadn't played a full season at center in 14 years.

So, Manning sits just one why shy of returning to the Super Bowl just two years after he was jettisoned by the Indianapolis Colts following four neck surgeries that strengthened his resolve but weakened his throwing arm.

“You don't take it for granted,” Manning said, “especially when you've been through an injury, been through a major change and you're in the home stretch of your career.”

Both the Patriots and Broncos have quarterbacks known as grinders, who elevate the play of those around them because of their meticulous preparation.

The Patriots lose players left and right, but with Belichick they're always playing for trophies.

Elway has the Broncos doing the same.

“Everybody thought it was a huge, horrible, financial disaster gamble, disaster with Peyton Manning,” Smith said. “And he's got those 92 touchdowns in two years. ... So, the organization has done a masterful job.”

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