Share This Page
NFL

NFL notebook: League may experiment with 42-yard PAT

| Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 7:03 p.m.

Extra-point kicks could get extra interesting this summer.

The NFL's competition committee has discussed experimenting in the preseason with placing the ball at the 25-yard line on extra-point kicks — which would mean 42-yard attempts, NFL.com reported.

NFL kickers made a record 99.6 percent of their PATs last season, making that the most sure-fire play in football.

Last season, kickers made 83 percent of their field-goal attempts that were 40 to 49 yards long.

Report: Panthers tag Hardy

Defensive end Greg Hardy signed his franchise tag tender with the Carolina Panthers, a person familiar with the situation said.

Hardy, who said in January he'd have no issue if the team used the franchise tag to keep him, will make $13.1 million for one season if he doesn't sign a long-term extension.

The Panthers have until July 15 to sign Hardy to a long-term deal. After that date they can't discuss a contract extension until after the season is over.

When the Panthers used the franchise tag on Hardy on Friday, general manager Dave Gettleman said in a press release it was done so to buy more time to potentially work out a long-term extension with the former Mississippi star.

“The franchise mechanism gives us time to secure the services of a very good player while we continue to look at the future of Greg with the Carolina Panthers,” Gettleman said. “We have had great dialogue with both Greg and his agent. It was important to keep our defensive front together.”

The four-year NFL veteran had 15 sacks last season, tying a franchise record previously established by Kevin Greene in 1996, and was selected to his first Pro Bowl.

Hardy has 26 sacks in his last two seasons.

Hardy led the Panthers with 38 quarterback pressures last season and posted a career-high 67 tackles for the NFC South champions.

The Panthers led the league in sacks last season with 60.

Gettleman said Hardy was “a big reason we were able to lead the league in sacks last year and keeps our defensive line intact.”

Eagles cut ties with WR Avant

The Eagles released wide receiver Jason Avant.

He played his first eight NFL seasons in Philadelphia and ranks 11th in team history with 297 receptions for 3,646 yards and 12 touchdowns. He was drafted in the fourth round in 2006 from the University of Michigan.

The Eagles re-signed free agent wide receivers Jeremy Maclin and Riley Cooper last week. Their return made Avant more expendable.

Avant had 38 receptions for 447 yards and two touchdowns last season. He had a career-high 53 catches in 2012.

Romo restructures deal

Quarterback Tony Romo restructured his contract, providing the Cowboys with a $10 million salary cap cushion, ESPN.com reported.

The team will convert $12.5 million of Romo's $13.5 million base salary into a signing bonus, which can be spread over the remaining years of his contract. The Cowboys also have renegotiated the contract of linebacker Sean Lee, a Upper St. Clair and Penn State product.

Around the league

The Jaguars released veteran guard Uche Nwaneri, who started 63 of the team's last 64 games and didn't miss a snap last season. … A person with knowledge of the decision confirmed the Vikings decided to release veteran tight end John Carlson. … Falcons running back Jason Snelling retired, ending his seven-year career. … The Redskins cut defensive lineman Adam Carriker and punter Sav Rocca. … The Chargers released cornerbacks Derek Cox and Johnny Patrick and fullback Le'Ron McClain.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.