Share This Page
NFL

NFL notebook: Kosar believes slurred speech cost him TV gig

| Thursday, April 24, 2014, 7:42 p.m.

Former Browns quarterback Bernie Kosar believes he was unfairly sacked as a TV broadcaster.

Kosar was removed as a color commentator for Cleveland's preseason games by the team. The Browns said Wednesday night he was being replaced by Solomon Wilcots, who will work with play-by-play announcer Jim Donovan.

Kosar contends he was removed because of slurred speech he attributes to “a direct result of the many concussions I received while playing in the NFL.”

The 50-year-old Kosar estimated he has had more than a dozen documented concussions.

Kosar called the situation “unfortunate” and said doing the preseason games is “truly one of the remaining joys in my life.”

Preseason PATs moved back

The NFL will discuss expanded playoffs and longer extra points at the owners' meetings next month in Atlanta.

Should the owners vote on the increase in May, commissioner Roger Goodell said the 14-team playoffs could be implemented for the upcoming season, or for 2015.

The NFL also will experiment with snapping the ball from the 15-yard line on extra points — a 33-yard kick — in the first two weeks of the preseason to make them more challenging.

Around the league

The district attorney's office referred the airport arrest of 49ers linebacker Aldon Smith to the Los Angeles city attorney's office for misdemeanor consideration. Smith was arrested April 13 at Los Angeles International Airport. ... The Bills cheerleaders will be making no appearances this year, a decision that comes days after a lawsuit over pay and working conditions.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.