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NFL

Niners QB Kaepernick gets $126M, six-year extension

| Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 7:48 p.m.

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick received a $126 million, six-year contract extension that keeps him with the organization through the 2020 season.

The deal includes $61 million in guaranteed money, a person with knowledge of the contract said.

Kaepernick, whose quick ascent to the ranks of the NFL's elite playcallers has earned him rock star status, had been due to make less than $1 million this season.

Now, he instantly becomes one of the league's richest stars.

“I'm always striving to be in that elite group in the NFL, not in pay but as a player,” Kaepernick said. “I'm very grateful for it. ... I don't think my motivation is money-driven.”

Since taking over the starting job from Alex Smith midway through the 2011 season, Kaepernick led the 49ers to their first Super Bowl in 18 years after the 2012 season — losing by three points to Baltimore — and then to the NFC championship game last season, a three-point defeat to the rival and eventual Super Bowl champion Seahawks.

• “Super Bowl 50” just looks better than “Super Bowl L.” X, V and I are nicely symmetrical, but with the unbalanced L in line for the 2015 season, the NFL decided to scrap the Roman numerals for a year. The championship game in Santa Clara, Calif., on Feb. 7, 2016, will be known as “Super Bowl 50.” The league has been contemplating this eventuality for nearly a decade, ever since the 40th edition ended with XL — which is not only visually pleasing but seemed an appropriate description of the extravaganza the Super Bowl has become. Starting last April, NFL executives viewed more than 70 potential logos for the 2016 game. They found it's hard to build an attractive image around what league vice president Jaime Weston calls “the lonely L.” Using the big 5-0 instead had the added benefit of emphasizing the significance of the Super Bowl's 50th iteration. That allows the NFL to celebrate the milestone all season long.

• Former Pro Bowl defenderMarcellus Wiley is among a second wave of players joining a lawsuit accusing NFL teams of illegally dispensing painkillers and other drugs to keep players on the field without regard for their long-term health. The lawsuit was filed May 20 and amended Wednesday to add 250 more former players, bringing the total number of plaintiffs to 750. Wiley, who played for four teams between 1997 and 2006 and currently works as an ESPN analyst, was the only player named in the new group. He becomes the ninth former player in the lawsuit identified by name, joining Bears starsJim McMahon and Richard Dent. “The first thing people ask is, knowing what happened, would you do it again?” Wiley said. “No. No I wouldn't.

• Browns Pro Bowl wide receiverJosh Gordon has pleaded not guilty to a speeding ticket. Gordon, who is awaiting a possible NFL suspension for failing a drug test, did not appear as scheduled in Berea Municipal Court. According to the court's website, his attorney entered a not guilty plea Tuesday. There is no new court date.

• Bills defensive end Jerry Hughes confirms he was driving the second car in an alleged race that led to teammate Marcell Dareus crashing his 2012 Jaguar into a tree last week.

Johnny Manziel went back to school on a day off from practice. The Browns' rookie quarterback and Cleveland's other first-year players attended an event at a Berea elementary school, where they kicked off a community service program. Welcomed by loud screams inside a packed gymnasium, Manziel smiled and slapped hands with dozens of kids before introducing himself to the crowd by saying, “I'm Johnny Manziel, and I'm from Texas.”

• The NFL suspended Giants defensive backJayron Hosley for the first four games of the 2014 season for violating the substance abuse policy.

• Two Raiders cheerleaders have sued the team and the NFL claiming they were subjected to poor working conditions while being paid less than minimum wage.

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