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NFL notebook: Salary cap collusion lawsuit kept alive

| Friday, June 20, 2014, 8:09 p.m.

• A players' union lawsuit accusing NFL team owners of setting a secret salary cap in 2010 was kept alive by a federal appeals court Friday. The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals partially reversed a federal judge's order that had rejected NFL Players Association's collusion claim. The three-judge appeals court panel that heard oral arguments in January disagreed with U.S. District Judge David Doty on one of the NFLPA's two arguments for pursuing damages despite the 2011 collective bargaining agreement that was supposed to settle such lawsuits. The appeals court sent the case back to Doty's jurisdiction in Minneapolis for further proceedings.

• Buffalo Sabres owners Terry and Kim Pegula said they have a strong desire to see the Bills stay in Buffalo, and aren't ruling out making a bid to buy the franchise. The Pegulas declined to go into further detail of their intentions in a statement released by the NHL team Friday. The statement was released a day after a person familiar with the sale process told the Associated Press the Pegulas were among prospective buyers who received a non-disclosure agreement and background on the Bills from a law firm representing late owner Ralph Wilson's estate.

• He played far more games with the Chicago Bears than Brian Urlacher and more games with the team than Dick Butkus and Jim McMahon combined. Long snapper Patrick Mannelly retired after playing more years and more games with the Bears than any player in team history. In his 16 years and 245 games with the team, Mannelly snapped the ball for extra points, punts and field goals 2,282 times.

•Former NFL players Tommie Harris and Eric Bassey are the first owners of a team in the new FXFL developmental league. The Fall Experimental Football League, which has no affiliation with the NFL, plans to play six games in October and November in six U.S. cities.

— AP

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