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NFL notebook: Jermichael Finley says the Steelers showed interest

| Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 7:06 p.m.

• Free agent tight end Jermichael Finley will undergo further testing on his injured neck Wednesday and send the results to all 32 teams, Finley told USA Today. Finley recently suggested he was hopeful for a reunion with the Packers. However, he told USA Today the Steelers have been interested enough to show him the makings of a contract. “Pittsburgh have showed me a couple deals, but we all know the money ain't what it's supposed to be,” Finley said.

• The Saints confirmed a multiyear contract with Jimmy Graham, ending a protracted holdout for the star tight end. Graham skipped all of the Saints' voluntary and mandatory practices and workouts and challenged the NFL's franchise tag process through arbitration. ESPN reported the deal is for four years and $40 million, with $21 million guaranteed.

• Former Vikings punter Chris Kluwe intends to sue the team over allegations of anti-gay conduct by a coach, his lawyer said. Lawyer Clayton Halunen said they will seek a copy of the Vikings' internal investigation and make it public if they can. They accused the Vikings of reneging on a pledge to release the report, which they believe corroborates Kluwe's claims.

• According to ESPN.com, the Cowboys will release quarterback Kyle Orton, meaning he won't have to pay back any of his $5 million signing bonus he received from them in 2012.

Panthers Pro Bowl defensive end Greg Hardy was found guilty of assaulting a female and communicating threats. Mecklenburg (N.C.) County Judge Rebecca Thorn-Tin sentenced Hardy to 18 months' probation. A 60-day jail sentence was suspended. Hardy's attorney Chris Fialko said he will appeal, and Hardy has asked for a jury trial in superior court. A date for the jury trial has not been set.

— Wire reports

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