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NFL notebook: Ravens RB Rice calls actions 'totally inexcusable'

| Thursday, July 31, 2014, 7:33 p.m.

Ray Rice stepped to the microphone, took a deep breath and spoke for 17 minutes about what he called “the biggest mistake of his life.”

His arrest for domestic violence against his then-fiancee last February is something Rice figures will haunt him long after NFL career has ended.

The Ravens running back was arrested on assault charges following a Feb. 15 altercation in New Jersey in which he allegedly struck Janay Palmer. Rice has been accepted into a diversion program, which upon completion could lead to the charges being dropped.

“My actions that night were totally inexcusable,” said Rice, who during Ravens training camp Thursday spoke publicly for the first time since receiving a two-game suspension from the NFL.

Rice wore a Ravens polo shirt and a pained expression throughout the session. More than a dozen TV cameras were in place, some telecasting the interview live, and several of his teammates stood behind the throng to show their support.

Lynch ends holdout

Marshawn Lynch joined the Seahawks training camp after missing the first week.

Lynch arrived Thursday afternoon following the team's morning practice. The team confirmed Lynch has reported for camp, ending a holdout that spanned a week.

Lynch has missed the first week of training camp unhappy with his contract status. Lynch is scheduled to make $5 million in base salary for 2014 with additional roster bonuses available. It's the third year of a four-year deal Lynch signed before the 2012 season.

With Lynch away, the Seahawks have let Robert Turbin and Christine Michael get the bulk of carries during camp.

Jaguars WRs Doss, Robinson injured in practice

Jaguars receiver Tandon Doss, expected to be the team's punt returner, badly injured his right ankle on the final play of practice.

Making matters worse for Jacksonville, rookie receiver Allen Robinson, a second-round pick out of Penn State, felt tightness in his right hamstring — the same injury that kept him out during organized team activities — and sat out most of practice.

Giants RB Wilson's future in doubt

Giants running back David Wilson, who suffered a neck stinger Tuesday and will miss this weekend's Hall of Fame game, may never play football again, the Newark Star Ledger reported.

Multiple sources told the Star Ledger that months after Wilson underwent spinal fusion surgery, and coupled with his latest setback, the former first-round pick “needs a miracle” to return to the playing field.

“We were praying that it would be not an issue,” coach Tom Coughlin said earlier in the week, “that he would be able to come back and just go to work and he was cleared, as you know.”

Chiefs safety Berry leaves practice

Eric Berry left Chiefs practice after hurting his right ankle, the second injury that the Pro Bowl safety has sustained so far in training camp.

Berry dislocated his finger in an earlier practice.

It was unclear what happened to Berry during one of the early sessions of the day's workout at Missouri Western. He walked gingerly to the tent next to the field and was checked on by trainers, and then talked with other team officials on the sideline before leaving on a cart.

“It's no Achilles, it's no ligament tear,” coach Andy Reid said. “We'll have to see.”

Around the league

Ravens rookie defensive end Brent Urban, a fourth-round pick from Virginia, is done for the season after tearing his right ACL in practice. … Jets safety Calvin Pryor, the team's first-round draft pick, has returned to practice on a limited basis as he recovers from a concussion. … Panthers defensive end Frank Alexander says he won't appeal his four-game suspension for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

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