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NHL notebook: Jets rookie Redmond undergoes surgery

| Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, 9:48 p.m.

• Jets rookie defenseman Zach Redmond has undergone surgery to repair a laceration to an artery in his right leg after a teammate accidentally stepped on him during the club's morning skate on Thursday. The injury occurred near the end of practice when Redmond tripped and landed on his back. The teammate then stepped on Redmond with his skate, opening a sizeable wound in Redmond's mid-thigh region — cutting the femoral artery. Redmond was rushed to the hospital and underwent a three-hour operation, the team said. The Jets added that Redmond was resting comfortably and will be out indefinitely. The 24-year-old Redmond has played in eight games this season. He has one goal, three assists and 12 penalty minutes.

• Flyers center Matt Read will miss six weeks because of torn rib cage muscles. Read was injured on a hit by Chris Kunitz in the first period of Philadelphia's 6-5 win at Pittsburgh on Wednesday night. Read leads the Flyers with seven goals, and his 13 points are third on the team.

• Brian Burke is returning to the Ducks as a part-time pro scout. Burke, who was the Ducks' general manager from 2005-08, was abruptly fired by the Maple Leafs last month after four playoff-free years as their president and GM. Anaheim had two 100-point seasons and won its only Stanley Cup championship during Burke's tenure.

• Blackhawks forward Marian Hossa practiced after taking a forearm to the back of the head from the Canucks' Jannik Hansen, and coach Joel Quenneville said Hossa could play Friday against the Sharks, according to an ESPN report.

• Prime Minister Stephen Harper is going ahead with a plan to put heart defibrillators in hockey arenas across Canada.

— AP

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