Share This Page
NHL

Boston beefs up security

| Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 8:27 p.m.

BOSTON — Security was tightened at the TD Garden, where the Boston Bruins played the Buffalo Sabres on Wednesday night in the first major sporting event in the city since the marathon bombings.

Cars were searched inside and out before entering the arena's underground garage in the morning, with guards using a mirror on a pole to check the undercarriage. Sports writers, usually subject to only the most cursory inspection, were waved with a metal-detecting wand when passing through security for the Bruins' morning skate.

“It brings back memories you don't want,” said Bruins forward Jay Pandolfo, who was with the New Jersey Devils during the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. “It's something you don't want to think about. You want to go ahead with your life. You don't want to live in fear.”

Inside the Garden lobby, which doubles as the North Station rail terminal, uniformed and plain-clothed police wandered among the commuters. Police cars and motorcycles were lined up on an access road outside.

“I'm sure tonight will be full of emotion,” forward Chris Kelly said. “If we can go play hard to help the city of Boston in any way we can, I know everybody in this locker room would be willing to do that.

“We love the city. We want to help in any way we can — if we can give them 10 minutes of joy, or 20 hours of joy — anything we can do.”

The Bruins' game against the Ottawa Senators on Monday night was to take place hours after a pair of bombs killed three people and injured more than 170 others at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The game was postponed until April 28.

“You're trying to live your life in peace, and there's people trying to disrupt that,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “The people trying to live their life in peace are going to stick together.”

Pandolfo, who went to Boston University, watched the marathon pass by as a student in the 1990s, before the Sept. 11 attacks brought the fear of terrorist attacks to U.S. soil.

“It's a great day. It's a great day for a lot of people,” he said. “There's no reason for this to happen. You never thought something like this could happen, especially in the city of Boston. Stuff like this doesn't cross your mind.”

All of the Bruins players said they feel safe at the arena and walking around the city, commending authorities for the added security since the bombing. Any anxiety, Julien said, needs to be directed toward the game.

“It's a different feeling, but you're battling with your inner strength to not let it get the best of you,” he said. “The best thing we can do is to make things better for the people of Boston. Sports is a great way to pull people together. Just going out there making the city proud of their team, and that's what we're going to do.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.