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NHL notebook: Former NHL players file concussion suit against league

| Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, 4:51 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Ten former National Hockey League players are claiming in a class-action lawsuit that the league hasn't done enough to protect players from concussions.

The lawsuit, filed Monday in federal court in Washington, seeks damages to be determined at trial. The players also are seeking court-approved medical monitoring for their brain trauma and/or injuries, which they blame on their NHL careers.

The lawsuit comes just three months after the National Football League agreed to pay $765 million to settle lawsuits from thousands of former players who developed dementia or other concussion-related health problems.

The ex-hockey players claim that the NHL purposely concealed the risks of brain injuries faced by players, exposing them to unnecessary dangers.

The NHL didn't respond to requests for comment, but earlier this year, NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said, ‘‘We have, on our own, a long history, going back to 1997, of taking concussions very seriously. ”

Blue Jackets make moves

The Blue Jackets placed center Brandon Dubinsky on injured reserve, activated defenseman Dalton Prout off injured reserve and added forward Sean Collins on emergency recall from Springfield in the AHL.

Dubinsky has five goals and 10 assists in 21 games with the Blue Jackets. He missed the past two games with a lower-body injury.

Prout had missed the past six games with a strained back.

Stamkos optimistic

Lightning star Steven Stamkos is walking without crutches or a boot two weeks after breaking his right leg.

He met with reporters Monday for the first time since the injury and said he fully expects to play again this season.

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