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NHL notebook: Veteran Langenbrunner retires

| Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014, 7:03 p.m.

Jamie Langenbrunner retired after a 16-year career in which he won two Stanley Cups. The 38-year-old right wing won the Stanley Cup with Dallas in 1999 and New Jersey in 2003. He appeared in 1,109 games, finishing with 243 goals and 420 assists.

• The Oilers made a pair of moves involving goaltenders. They acquired backup goalie Ben Scrivens from the Kings for a third-round pick in the upcoming draft. Edmonton also sent goalie Devan Dubnyk to the Predators for forward Matt Hendricks. Scrivens went 7-5-4 over 19 appearances in his only season with the Kings. He had a 1.97 goals-against average, a .931 save percentage and three shutouts with the Kings. The Predators were able to get rid of the four-year contract they signed Hendricks to last July for $7.4 million.

• Red Wings center Pavel Datsyuk was named captain of Russia's Olympic hockey team. Datsyuk is recovering from a lower-body injury that has sidelined him almost two weeks.

Zach Parise returned to practice with the Wild for the first time since playing against the Rangers on Dec. 22, NHL.com reported. Parise reportedly was diagnosed with a fractured foot and has been on injured reserve since Dec. 28.

• Maple Leafs centerDave Bolland took strides Wednesday toward his return to the lineup, TSN reported. A video on the Leafs' website showed Bolland skating in full pads and taking part in individual drills. Bolland suffered a severed tendon in his left ankle while playing against the Canucks in early November.

— Wire reports

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