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NHL

Lightning LW Malone arrested for DUI, cocaine possession

| Saturday, April 12, 2014, 11:48 a.m.
Tampa Bay Lightning left wing Ryan Malone (12) stretches before a game against the Minnesota Wild on Feb. 4, 2014, in St. Paul, Minn. Malone was charged Saturday with DUI and possession of cocaine after a traffic stop, police said.

TAMPA, Fla. — Lightning left wing and former Penguin Ryan Malone was charged Saturday with DUI and possession of cocaine after a traffic stop, police said.

An officer saw Malone's SUV strike a curb after making a left turn from the center lane early Saturday, said Tampa Police Lt. Paul Lusczynski.

After being pulled over, Malone got out of his vehicle, and the officer smelled alcohol on his breath, Lusczynski said.

According to the police report, the officer also found 1.3 grams of cocaine in one of Malone's pockets.

Malone, an Upper St. Clair native, refused to take field sobriety tests, but a breath test given at the jail recorded blood alcohol levels of 0.112 and 0.116 percent, Lusczynski said. Florida law considers a driver impaired at 0.08.

Malone was released from the Hillsborough County jail on $2,500 bond.

“We are aware of the situation this morning involving Tampa Bay Lightning forward Ryan Malone,” NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly said in a statement. “Under the terms of the collectively bargained joint NHL/NHLPA Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program, Mr. Malone is subject to mandatory evaluation and, if deemed necessary by the Program Doctors, treatment pursuant to the terms of that Program.

“His future playing status, both in the near term and during the Playoffs, will be determined in accordance the terms of our SABH Program.”

Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman said Malone wouldn't travel with the team for Tampa Bay's final regular-season game Sunday against the Capitals.

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