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Olympics notebook: South Korea protests women's figure skating result

| Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, 7:37 p.m.

The South Korean Olympic Committee has protested the results of the women's figure skating competition, although the sport's international governing body said Saturday it has not yet received the letter.

International Skating Union rules always have required such protests be filed immediately after the event.

The Koreans believe the judging was biased and cost Yuna Kim a second gold medal. The 2010 champion finished with silver, behind Russian teenager Adelina Sotnikova.

Much of the uproar over the women's free skate centers on what many perceived as a lack of artistry in Sotnikova's program. Yet her marks were comparable or better than those for the highly artistic Kim. Her technical marks were significantly better.

Skicross controversy

The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Canada and Slovenia have asked that France's freestyle skicross podium sweep at the Olympics be thrown out because of suit adjustments.

The court said the countries allege French team staffers changed the shaping of the ahtletes' ski pants for better aerodynamics.

The event's rules prohibit athletes from altering their uniforms for aerodynamic purposes.

The sweep by Jean Frederic Chapuis, Arnaud Bovolenta and Jonathan Midol was France's first gold, silver and bronze in the same event at any Winter Olympics.

2 more drug suspensions

A Latvian hockey player and a Ukrainian cross-country skier failed drug tests, bringing to four the number of doping cases in these Olympics.

The International Olympic Committee said Vitalijs Pavlovs and Marina Lisogor were expelled from the Games.

Pavlovs tested positive for the stimulant methylhexanamine following Latvia's loss to Canada in the quarterfinals Thursday. The 30-year-old Lisogor tested positive for trimetazidine Tuesday after the women's team sprint.

Davis weighs future

Shani Davis wanted to end his Olympic career with a flourish. Instead, one of America's greatest speedskaters endured a miserable time with the rest of his U.S. teammates.

For the first time since 1984, the Americans failed to win any medals in 12 events at the oval, leaving Davis pondering his future in the sport he's loved since he first started skating as a 6-year-old in his hometown of Chicago.

“We came in being one of the most decorated disciplines in the Winter Olympics and we come away with zero medals,” he said. “It's horrible.”

Davis wasn't at Adler Arena on Saturday when the U.S. men finished seventh in team pursuit.

Plushenko slates surgery

Four-time Olympic medalist Evgeni Plushenko will have back surgery March 2.

Plushenko, 31, withdrew from the men's figure skating short program at the Sochi Games just days after helping Russia win the team gold. He warmed up for the event Feb. 13 and then dropped out, leaving the host nation with no competitor.

The 2006 gold medalist has a history of injuries and fought several physical problems throughout his career. He said he has had 12 surgeries.

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