ShareThis Page
Other Local

Pittsburgh Marathon will follow same route as 2017, time limit increased

Chris Adamski
| Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018, 1:51 p.m.
Runners cross the finish line after completing their half-marathons during the 2017 Pittsburgh Marathon in downtown Sunday May 07, 2017.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Runners cross the finish line after completing their half-marathons during the 2017 Pittsburgh Marathon in downtown Sunday May 07, 2017.
Marathon runners depart from the starting line to begin their race during the 2017 Pittsburgh Marathon, downtown, Sunday, May 07, 2017.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Marathon runners depart from the starting line to begin their race during the 2017 Pittsburgh Marathon, downtown, Sunday, May 07, 2017.
Runners cross the finish line after completing their half-marathons during the 2017 Pittsburgh Marathon in downtown Sunday May 07, 2017.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Runners cross the finish line after completing their half-marathons during the 2017 Pittsburgh Marathon in downtown Sunday May 07, 2017.

The course for the 2018 Pittsburgh Marathon will remain identical to last year's race. The maximum time to finish it, however, is being increased.

The May 6 race – the 10th since the marathon returned following a five-year hiatus – will again start on Liberty Avenue between Smithfield and 10th streets downtown and finish on the Boulevard of the Allies between Wood and Market streets .

But while previous runs (from 1985-2003 and from 2009-17) had a full marathon course time limit of six hours, this year that is being increased to seven hours. Half-marathon participants will now have 3½ hours to complete the course.

The new maximum times represent a 16-minute per mile pace, up from the former 14-minute mile pace.

"Our race weekend has become one of the fastest growing in the country over the past 10 years, and we're hoping this course time limit change will encourage even more people to become a 'Runner of Steel' during our 10th anniversary year," P3R CEO and race director Patrice Matamoros said in a prepared statement.

The course again meanders through many Pittsburgh neighborhoods and past PNC Park, Heinz Field and PPG Paints Arena.

"Though construction plans often force us to make changes from year to year, we're excited to once again offer a route that was a winner with runners, spectators and city officials last year," P3R COO and director of marketing Dee Stathis said in a statement. "This course provides runners with a scenic view of the Steel City, as well as an opportunity for thousands of Pittsburghers to get involved with our city's largest community celebration."

Chris Adamski is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at cadamski@tribweb.com or via Twitter @C_AdamskiTrib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me