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Alle-Kiski notebook: Cressler scores 38 in summer league game

| Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 4:24 p.m.

Cornell sophomore-to-be and Plum native Nolan Cressler showed he had a knack for high-scoring games at the high-school level.

Plum's all-time scoring leader with 1,565 points, Cressler led WPIAL Class AAAA in scoring at 25.8 points as a senior and broke the Cager Classic all-star game scoring mark with 38 points.

The rising college guard is at it again in the Pittsburgh Basketball Club Pro-Am League, which runs through July 17.

Cressler on Monday showed why he'll be one of the top returning backcourt players in the Ivy League when he scored 38 for his South Hills Audi team in a 90-83 win over PGT at Greentree Sportsplex. Cressler shot 14 for 20 from the field — 8 for 13 from 3-point range — grabbed 10 rebounds and had five assists.

His all-around game is rounding into shape in front of top college and semi-pro talent in the summer league.

“I know I have to work on being more aggressive on both sides of the floor going into next season, so that's what I am trying to do this summer,” Cressler said. “My teammates were really looking for me (in that game) and did a good job of putting me in good situations to score.”

Cressler was a two-time Ivy League Rookie of the Week last season. He averaged 9.3 points and 3.7 rebounds and made a team-high 54 3-pointers.

He shot 43 percent from the floor.

Country pride

Leechburg's Matt Barto contributed three wins that helped the International Junior Golf Tour's U.S. team take the North America Cup, 16-12, over Canada.

Barto, who will be a senior and was the oldest player on the U.S. team at 17, paired with Mark Benevento of Somers Point, N.J., to down Mike Flegel and Michael McPhail, 5 and 4, in fourball play. He and Eamon Marone of Belvidere, N.J., topped Rhys Davies and John McKiernan, 4 and 2, in foursomes.

Barto capped the event with a 1-up win over Flegel in singles, rallying from a 3-down deficit after 11 holes at Toronto's Weston Golf and Country Club.

Court's in session

A pair of former local players found their way into the main draw of the PNC Men's Futures tennis tournament, which is this week in Mt. Lebanon.

Fox Chapel's Chris Mengel, a senior at Duke and a Shady Side Academy graduate, joined former Knoch standout and cyber-schooler Brandon Anandan in the 32-player singles draw.

Mengel, a former WPIAL and PIAA Class AAA champion, was an All-ACC pick last year.

Anandan lives in the North Hills and is the son of Krishnan Anandan, a popular teaching pro at Lakevue Athletic Club in Butler.

Bill Beckner Jr. is the local sports editor of the Valley News Dispatch. Reach him at bbeckner@tribweb.com.

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