ShareThis Page

Pitt graduate figures into U.S. skating scene

| Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Submitted
Ryan Devereaux of Swisshelm Park and his ice dancing partner Charlotte Maxwell placed eighth of 14 pairs at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships last month in St. Paul, Minn.
Submitted
Ryan Devereaux of Swisshelm Park and his ice dancing partner Charlotte Maxwell placed eighth of 14 pairs at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships last month in St. Paul, Minn.

Ryan Devereaux of Swisshelm Park and his ice dancing partner are generating a buzz in the figure skating community after a strong showing at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships last month in St. Paul, Minn.

Devereaux, 26, and Charlotte Maxwell, 26, of Dallas placed eighth of 14 competitors in the championship dance event.

Marina Zoueva, the head of the International Skating Academy in Canton, Mich., where they train, said the two have a chemistry that is evident in their skating.

“I think they will do well internationally,” she said. “This can be their breakout season.”

U.S. Figure Skating spokeswoman Renee Felton said based on their finish, Devereaux and Maxwell likely will be considered for a spot on a national team that will compete overseas next fall. The team will be announced in May or June.

Devereaux and Maxwell became partners in May 2014. They placed ninth last year in their first trip to nationals.

They qualified for this year's national tournament by earning a gold medal at the Eastern Sectional championships in Simsbury, Conn., last November.

Devereaux said their goal is to keep improving so they can contend for a berth on the 2018 U.S. Olympic Team.

Devereaux said he and Maxwell met at 2006 nationals in St. Louis and have been best friends since. Both retired from competitive skating in 2008-09 to pursue college educations before returning to the ice.

“We have a lot of respect for each other,” Devereaux said. “Charlotte is much more creative.

“I'm more technical on the ice.”

Maxwell, who is 5-foot-4, said she enjoys skating with Devereaux, who is 5-8.

“We work well together,” she said. “Ryan's always positive. Everybody (at the academy) loves him.”

Devereaux, who has been skating since he was 6 years old, joined the International Skating Academy in summer 2005. The club is renowned for producing 2014 Olympic gold medalists Meryl Davis and Charlie White.

Devereaux graduated from a Western Pennsylvania cyber school in 2007 and earned a degree in psychology and communications from Pitt.

He serves as a skating coach at Robert Morris University Island Sports Center on Neville Island, where he trained previously.

Devereaux and Maxwell are crowdfunding at gofundme.com/fonbnk to pay for their skating expenses, which Devereaux said are upwards of $50,000.

Karen Kadilak is a freelance writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.