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Seton-La Salle senior hoops standout signs with Duquesne

| Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012, 8:52 p.m.
South Hills Record
Seton-La Salle's Angela Heintz, at right, shown being guarded by a Bishop Canevin defender in last year's WPIAL Class AA championship game, has signed a letter of intent with Duquesne University. Randy Jarosz | For The South Hills Record

Duquesne University women's head basketball coach Suzie McConnell-Serio has announced the Lady Dukes' signings for the high school Class of 2013.

Seton-La Salle senior Angela Heintz, along with Erin Waskowiak, Chelsea Welch, Kyasia Duling and Amadea Szamosi, have signed national letters of intent with the Lady Dukes.

Brianna Thomas also has accepted a scholarship offer from the team.

“This is our biggest class we have signed at Duquesne, and we are very excited about what each player brings to our team, on and off the court,” McConnell-Serio, a former Penn State and Seton-La Salle star, said.

“They all complement each other and will add to our team chemistry as they are amazing young ladies.”

Heintz, a 5-foot-10 guard, led the Lady Rebels to both WPIAL and PIAA championships as a junior.

Seton-La Salle finished 30-0 overall last season, and was the third girls' basketball team in WPIAL history to finish a season undefeated.

Heintz was named third-team all-state in Class AA last year. She averaged 14.1 points per game.

Additionally, she was selected to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review's “Terrific Ten” all-star team.

Heintz played AAU basketball for the Western Pa. Bruins.

“Angela is a proven winner with an incredible work ethic,” McConnell-Serio said. “She is a strong guard that can shoot the three as well as score off the dribble.

“She is a smart player who does all the little things that make a big difference.”

Waskowiak is a 5-11 senior guard at Bishop Canevin, one of Seton-La Salle's arch-rivals.

Last season, Waskowiak scored 20.4, grabbed 8.4 rebounds, dished out 5 assists and had 3 steals per game.

A varsity starter since her freshman year, she has scored 1,439 career points for the Lady Crusaders.

Waskowiak joined Heintz on the Tribune-Review's “Terrific Ten” team, and was a Class AA second-team all-state selection.

She also played AAU basketball for the Western Pa. Bruins.

“Erin is a tremendous athlete, and is great in the open floor,” McConnell-Serio said. “She can really handle the ball ... is a scorer ... and has great instincts on the court. She impacts the game at both ends of the floor; she plays with so much energy.”

Welch, a 5-10 guard from Dayton, led Fairmont to the Greater Western Ohio Conference championship, and the Ohio State High School title game last season.

Fairmont finished the 2011-12 campaign with a 24-4 overall record.

Duling, a 6-3 forward from New Albany, Ohio, led New Albany to 17 wins while averaging a double-double of 11.2 points and 10.3 rebounds per game as a junior.

Szamosi is a 6-3 forward who plays for PEAC-Pécs in the Hungarian-A Division. During the 2012 FIBA U18 European championship, Szamosi averaged a team-best 13.3 ppg and 11.0 rpg.

Thomas, who will be the fourth Canadian on the team, is a 5-11 guard and a fifth-year senior at Notre Dame in Ajax, Ontario.

Thomas has led the Lady Cougars to a 25-4 record and No. 1 ranking in the Greater Toronto Area this season.

Duquesne's recruiting class has been labeled the second-best among 16 teams in the Atlantic 10 Conference by Blue Star Basketball.

Information for this story courtesy of Duquesne University athletics.

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