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NBA notebook: Wade says Heat shouldn't have played in N.Y.

| Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, 8:36 p.m.

Dwyane Wade thought the NBA should have postponed Miami's game Friday night in New York.

With city hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, the Knicks' game scheduled for Thursday in Brooklyn was postponed, and Heat players thought theirs would follow. Instead, they flew from Miami on Thursday afternoon and arrived in their New York hotel after a three-hour bus ride from nearby Newark, N.J.

Wade was so sure the game would be postponed that he never even packed until after practice Thursday. His reaction to all the traffic as New Yorkers struggle to recover further convinced him it should have been rescheduled.

“If we're in a car and we're in traffic for three hours, what are other people who are really affected by this, what are they doing? How are they getting around, how are they moving, et cetera?” Wade said after the Heat's morning shootaround at Madison Square Garden.

“So it was just like, come on man, we shouldn't be here to play a basketball game. If anything, we should be here to do something to help the city.”

The NBA had no response to Wade's comment.

Wade is planning to donate the equivalent of a game check — $209,536.59 before taxes — to relief efforts, a decision he made Friday morning. He's done similar things in the past, like joining former Heat teammate Alonzo Mourning to raise $1 million after a massive earthquake struck Haiti in 2010.

LeBron James said he was glad to be in the city but was aware that even New Yorkers were conflicted as to whether the games should go on.

“I think we're all in agreement when we say that getting everything situated and getting everything back up and running from the hurricane is more important than a basketball game, but there's also people that believe that we need this basketball game for a lot of spirits and a lot of families,” James said.

Blazers-Lakers game sets NBA-TV record

The Trail Blazers' win that sent the new-look Lakers to a 0-2 start was the most-watched telecast in NBA TV channel history.

The game Wednesday night drew 868,000 viewers, the network said. The largest previous audience for an NBA TV telecast was 847,000 for the debut of “Dream Team,” last summer's documentary about the 1992 U.S. Olympic basketball gold medalists.

The previous high for a game was the 835,000 who watched Game 5 of the Memphis-San Antonio playoff series April 27, 2011.

Combined with the Spurs-Hornets opener, NBA TV had its most-viewed opening night Wednesday.

Mavericks waive Curry, sign Murphy

The Eddy Curry era is over for the Mavericks after just two games.

Dallas announced it waived the journeyman center and replaced him with newly signed free-agent center Troy Murphy.

In two games, Curry averaged 4.5 points and two rebounds in 12.5 minutes.

LeBron getting Olympic banner from Heat

To commemorate James' role in helping the U.S. men's basketball team win gold at this past summer's London Olympics, the Heat will unveil a banner in his honor Saturday before they play the Nuggets.

It will be displayed alongside three others for players who won Olympic gold as members of the Heat — Wade, Mourning and Tim Hardaway.

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