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After stunning loss, Pacquiao faces tough choices

REUTERS - Manny Pacquiao rises from the canvas after being knocked down by Juan Manuel Marquez in the third round of their welterweight fight on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, at e MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. (Reuters)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>REUTERS</em></div>Manny Pacquiao rises from the canvas after being knocked down by Juan Manuel Marquez in the third round of their welterweight fight on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, at e MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. (Reuters)
AP - Juan Manuel Marquez (left) and Manny Pacquiao trade punches during their WBO world welterweight fight Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012. (AP)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Juan Manuel Marquez (left) and Manny Pacquiao trade punches during their WBO world welterweight fight Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012. (AP)

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By The Associated Press
Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, 7:14 p.m.
 

MANILA, Philippines — Manny Pacquiao already has achieved what most of his countrymen can only dream of: lifting himself out of wrenching poverty, securing a future for his children and becoming a hero to Filipinos the world over.

Not content with just winning in the ring, Pacquiao also set about making his mark in politics.

But after his stunning loss to Juan Manuel Marquez on Saturday in Las Vegas, the 34-year-old is facing some of the toughest questions of his remarkable 17-year career: Does his future lay in boxing, politics, show business, religion or perhaps even a new challenge?

“Being the king of boxing, being the highest-paid athlete in boxing ... it goes with the territory,” boxing analyst Ed Tolentino said. “For Pacquiao, the fame was too much to handle. There was just too many things on his plate other than boxing.”

The distraction was costly for Pacquiao, who trained for two months, compared to 4 12 for Marquez. During that time, the Mexican bulked up and became more muscular to withstand the blows from Pacquiao that proved so damaging in their three previous encounters.

Pacquiao grew up a survivor and fighter, overcoming poverty and cut-throat competition in a country where half of the population lives on $2 a day and 3,000 leave for jobs overseas every day.

After finding success in local bouts, Pacquiao began his international career in the late 1990s. In the next decade, he became a household name by clinching eight world titles in eight weight categories. At home, he was declared a hero, “the people's champ.”

But as the titles, honors and money started pouring in, so did distractions.

In a nation where celebrities, money and politics equal a winning formula, Pacquiao played his card by running for Congress in 2007 but lost.

The most popular face in town, he turned to crooning his own songs. His picture endorsed countless products. He's a regular on TV and hosts his own show. He's made a movie. Another passion is cock fighting, a past time in the Philippines.

There are questions about whether Pacquiao is showing the wear of 17 years in the ring and whether the distractions are catching up with him. Saturday's loss to Marquez, whom he had beaten twice and drawn once, only made those questions more urgent, although Pacquiao made no mention of a possible retirement.

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