Share This Page

Celtics PG Rondo tears right ACL; season over

| Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, 4:11 p.m.

BOSTON — Boston Celtics star point guard Rajon Rondo will miss the rest of the season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee.

The news came during Boston's 100-98 double-overtime win over the Miami Heat on Sunday.

“New guys are going to get an opportunity now,” Boston forward Paul Pierce said. “These guys haven't had a chance to really showcase what they can do.”

For the past five seasons, Pierce, Allen and Kevin Garnett made up the Big Three. After Allen signed with the Heat as a free agent in the offseason, Rondo joined that group — and became the team leader with his ability to run the offense.

He was chosen as the starting point guard for the Eastern Conference in the All-Star game in Houston on Feb. 17.

Now the Celtics hope he can be ready for the start of next season.

“How far is that?” coach Doc Rivers said, “I don't even know how long that is. Eight months? Nine months? So he'll probably be ready, but I don't know.

Rondo injured his right knee in Friday night's 123-112 double-overtime loss in Atlanta, a game in which the Celtics blew a 27-point lead, but Rivers said he didn't know when.

He reported to the TD Garden on Sunday for a pregame shootaround but was taken to a hospital after complaining of pain.

The initial report was a hyperextended knee, but tests showed the ACL tear.

Rivers said he learned about 25 minutes before the game that Rondo wouldn't play. Word of the injury's severity came during the game.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.