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While LeBron soars, Wade generates Heat

| Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, 9:06 p.m.
NBAE/Getty Images
The Heat's Dwyane Wade brings the ball up court against the Pistons earlier this season. (Getty Images)

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade got the ball on the left wing, darted toward the basket, leaped to avoid Dwight Howard and dunked from the right side of the rim.

A year ago, a play such as that one from Sunday might have been impossible for Wade.

Now, he's looking good as new at maybe the perfect time for the surging Miami Heat.

LeBron James might be the best player in the world and might be playing like the best player in the world, but he's hardly having to carry the entire load for the Heat these days. While James is on a history-making run of scoring at least 30 points and shooting at least 60 percent in Miami's last five games — all wins — Wade is averaging 24.8 points on better than 50 percent shooting over that same stretch.

And what's weird is, it almost seems as if Wade is doing it quietly.

“I know what a problem he is,” said the Lakers' Kobe Bryant, who watched Wade score 30 in a Heat win Sunday. “You try to focus in on him as much as you can. They have two very, very special players. Two of the best that we've seen. Dwyane obviously is dealing with injuries starting the year, but he seems to be rounding into form and you saw that breakaway dunk he had — that's the younger D-Wade.”

During this Miami winning streak, James and Wade are combining to average 55.8 points a game. Tony Parker and Danny Green combined to average 49.3 points for San Antonio. Carmelo Anthony and Amare Stoudemire averaged 48.8 points for the New York Knicks. James Harden and Jeremy Lin scored 47.1 per game for Houston.

Sure, James is on an unbelievable roll. At least some of the credit for that, he believes, goes to Wade for being hot at the same time.

“His legs are under him. You can tell on his jump shot, he is finishing up-top and he is penetrating and getting to the rim, too,” James said after Wade's 30-point showing Sunday. “He is getting healthier and healthier each and every day, each and every game. It is a huge plus for our team and I know how great he feels right now.”

Miami closes its homestand Tuesday against Portland, then is at Oklahoma City for a 2012 NBA Finals rematch before heading into the All-Star break.

And part of the reason why Wade is hurting opponents is because he's hurting less than he has in the past. Wade said months ago that he figured offseason knee surgery would keep him from getting to his best level until about the All-Star break.

Here comes that timeframe, and Wade is flying.

“Feeling good,” Wade said. “Feeling better. I've come in and gotten my work in, taken care of my body and it's working.”

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