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Kobe: 'Frustration is unbearable' after injury

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By The Associated Press

Published: Saturday, April 13, 2013, 4:02 p.m.

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. — Kobe Bryant had surgery Saturday on his torn Achilles tendon, ending his season with two games left in the Los Angeles Lakers' playoff chase.

Lakers trainer Gary Vitti thinks Bryant will need six to nine months for recovery from the most serious injury of his 17-year NBA career. Given Bryant's history of swift recovery from countless minor injuries, Vitti and Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak believe the 34-year-old guard could be back for their season opener in the fall.

“I think that's a realistic goal for him, based on what he was talking about this morning,” Kupchak said at the Lakers' training complex after visiting Bryant at the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic.

Bryant completely tore his left Achilles tendon late in the Lakers' 118-116 win over Golden State on Friday night, falling to the hardwood after pushing off his planted foot in an ordinary move toward the hoop. He stayed in the game to hit two tying free throws with 3:08 to play.

Bryant's foot will be immobilized for about a month to prevent him from stretching out the tendon, followed by a lengthy rehabilitation process. Nobody knows how the injury will affect Bryant's play, but his decision to have surgery less than 24 hours after suggests he's determined to get back quick.

“He's already taken the challenge,” Vitti said. “For us, it's going to be trying to slow him down.”

And while it's far too early to predict exactly when Bryant will be back, the Lakers say they wouldn't consider parting ways with their franchise player, who will make nearly $30.5 million next year. If the Lakers used the amnesty clause on Bryant in early July, they could save possibly $80 million in luxury taxes.

“That's not even something that we've discussed,” Kupchak said. “That's the furthest thing from our mind.”

The fourth-leading scorer in NBA history has logged heavy minutes all season on his high-mileage legs, basically dictating his own playing time while the Lakers chased a playoff spot. He has played far more minutes than any other NBA player over 30, including nearly 46 minutes per game in the seven games leading up to Friday night.

Bryant simply doesn't like to sit out, even when he's hobbling. While Achilles tendon tears can occur in athletes under any level of stress, even first-year coach Mike D'Antoni acknowledged he might have forced Bryant to sit out a bit more if the Lakers weren't desperate for every victory.

“He's a warrior,” D'Antoni said. “All I do is respect what he wanted to do for the franchise and the city. He's earned the right to do certain things. ... I would have probably (made Bryant rest more) if we were comfortably in the playoffs. When you're trying to win at all cost, maybe you make some decisions that you'd better not.”

Bryant fought back tears in the locker room moments after learning his tendon was torn, and he wrote a lengthy Facebook post about his injury early Saturday morning, saying his “frustration is unbearable.”

“Why the hell did this happen ?!?” Bryant wrote. “Now I'm supposed to come back from this and be the same player Or better at 35?!? How in the world am I supposed to do that?? “

He added: “Maybe this is how my book ends. Maybe Father Time has defeated me...Then again maybe not!”

 

 
 


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