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Pa. Game Commission director to retire

| Tuesday, July 9, 2013, 9:33 p.m.

HARRISBURG — The Pennsylvania Game Commission's executive director has announced his plans to step down next year.

Upon his retirement in January, Carl G. Roe will have spent more than eight years heading the agency.

In making his announcement Tuesday, Roe said it has been his pleasure to serve Pennsylvania's hunters and outdoor enthusiasts while working to benefit the state's wildlife.

“Serving with the Game Commission, particularly in the role of executive director, has been a great honor and privilege,” Roe said. “I take pride and satisfaction in the years I've spent here, and our many, many achievements.

“I'll never stop caring about Pennsylvania's wildlife, but the time is right for me to step into retirement, where I'll have more time to spend outdoors enjoying it.”

Upon his retirement Jan. 17, Roe will leave behind a lengthy list of accomplishments, some of which predate his appointment as executive director.

Roe joined the Game Commission in 2001 as the agency's first-ever long-range strategic planner.

The Game Commission's strategic plan, which charts a course for present and future wildlife management statewide, is a product of his efforts.

Among its many objectives, the plan contains one of Roe's most well-known guiding philosophies — that Pennsylvanians should understand the Game Commission plays an integral role in the encounters people have with wildlife.

To that end, Roe developed the “Connect with Wildlife” slogan the commission has used for several years.

Robert Schlemmer, president of the Board of Game Commissioners, said the board will consider both internal and external candidates in finding the most-qualified person to replace Roe as administrator.

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