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The top 50 Penguins as the franchise turns 50

Jonathan Bombulie
| Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, 5:12 p.m.
Mario Lemieux
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Mario Lemieux
Penguins captain Sidney Crosby, the Conn Smythe winner, holds the Stanley Cup on Sunday, June 12, 2016, at SAP Center in San Jose, Calif.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Penguins captain Sidney Crosby, the Conn Smythe winner, holds the Stanley Cup on Sunday, June 12, 2016, at SAP Center in San Jose, Calif.
The Penguins' Jaromir Jagr brings the puck up ice in the first period against the Vancouver Canucks on Feb. 11, 1999.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Penguins' Jaromir Jagr brings the puck up ice in the first period against the Vancouver Canucks on Feb. 11, 1999.
Penguins center Evgeni Malkin plays against the Coyotes Saturday, March 28, 2015 at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Trib Total Media
Penguins center Evgeni Malkin plays against the Coyotes Saturday, March 28, 2015 at Consol Energy Center.
Penguins defenseman Paul Coffey skates with the puck against the Canadiens.
NHLI via Getty Images
Penguins defenseman Paul Coffey skates with the puck against the Canadiens.
Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury plays against the New York Rangers on March 3, 2016, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury plays against the New York Rangers on March 3, 2016, at Consol Energy Center.
Ron Francis
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Ron Francis
The Penguins' Kris Letang plays against the Wild on Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Trib Total Media
The Penguins' Kris Letang plays against the Wild on Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015, at Consol Energy Center.
The North Stars' Brian Bellows (23) knocks the goal net off its post after he was sent crashing into it by the Penguins' Larry Murphy (55) as goalie Tom Barrasso guards during the first period of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final on May 25, 1991, in Bloomington, Minn.
The North Stars' Brian Bellows (23) knocks the goal net off its post after he was sent crashing into it by the Penguins' Larry Murphy (55) as goalie Tom Barrasso guards during the first period of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final on May 25, 1991, in Bloomington, Minn.
Tom Barrasso
Tom Barrasso
Linesman Jay Sharrers escorts the Penguins' Max Talbot off the ice as Talbot gestures to the crowd during Game 6 of the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs against the Flyers on April 25, 2009, at Wachovia Center in Philadelphia.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Linesman Jay Sharrers escorts the Penguins' Max Talbot off the ice as Talbot gestures to the crowd during Game 6 of the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs against the Flyers on April 25, 2009, at Wachovia Center in Philadelphia.
The Penguins' Rick Kehoe skates against the Bruins.
NHLI via Getty Images
The Penguins' Rick Kehoe skates against the Bruins.
The Penguins' Mark Recchi heads up ice during a game against the Maple Leafs on Oct. 25, 2007n at Mellon Arena.
NHLI via Getty Images
The Penguins' Mark Recchi heads up ice during a game against the Maple Leafs on Oct. 25, 2007n at Mellon Arena.
Penguins forward Alexei Kovalev is seen during a game agaiinst the Rangers on Jan. 11, 2003, at Mellon Arena.
Penguins forward Alexei Kovalev is seen during a game agaiinst the Rangers on Jan. 11, 2003, at Mellon Arena.
The Penguins' Ulf Samuelsson plays against the Quebec Nordiques on Feb. 27, 1995.
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The Penguins' Ulf Samuelsson plays against the Quebec Nordiques on Feb. 27, 1995.
Joe Cullen
Joe Cullen
The Pittsburgh Penguins announced Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015, that forward Pascal Dupuis will no longer play hockey “because of a medical condition related to blood clots.”
Gregory Shamus/Getty Images
The Pittsburgh Penguins announced Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015, that forward Pascal Dupuis will no longer play hockey “because of a medical condition related to blood clots.”
Penguins goaltender Matt Murray talks with Jeff Zatkoff and Chris Kunitz before a shoot-out against the Maple Leafs Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015, at Consol Energy Center.
Christopher Horner | Trib Total Media
Penguins goaltender Matt Murray talks with Jeff Zatkoff and Chris Kunitz before a shoot-out against the Maple Leafs Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015, at Consol Energy Center.
Ryan Malone of the Penguins warms up before the start of Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Flyers on May 13, 2008, at Wachovia Center in Philadelphia.
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Ryan Malone of the Penguins warms up before the start of Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Flyers on May 13, 2008, at Wachovia Center in Philadelphia.

On Oct. 11, 1967, Hall of Famer Andy Bathgate scored the first goal in franchise history. Last June 12, Patric Hornqvist hit an empty net to seal the team's fourth Stanley Cup championship.

In between, some of the greatest stars the game has ever known have pulled on a Penguins a jersey. As the team celebrates its 50th anniversary, staff writer Jonathan Bombulie compiled a list of the 50 greatest players in franchise history.

Players were judged by their accomplishments, longevity and historical impact. A panel of Penguins historians including Bob Grove, Paul Steigerwald, Joe Starkey, Rob Rossi and others consulted on the final list.

Players are listed with the years they played for the Penguins, the numbers they accrued with the team and where those numbers rank in franchise history.

• 1. Mario Lemieux

1984-06

Games: 915 (1st)

Goals: 690 (1st)

Points: 1,723 (1st)

There are no superlatives too over the top to describe Lemieux's impact on the Penguins. He wowed crowds with his grace on the ice, then saved the team from bankruptcy and potential relocation. No athlete in any sport is synonymous with a team like Lemieux is with the Penguins.

• 2. Sidney Crosby

2005-16

Games: 707 (5th)

Goals: 338 (3rd)

Points: 938 (3rd)

Using unparalleled speed, skill and work ethic, Crosby already established himself as the greatest player of his generation before the puck dropped to start the 2016 playoffs. A Conn Smythe Trophy and second Stanley Cup ring vaulted him further into the stratosphere of all-time greats.

• 3. Jaromir Jagr

1990-01

Games: 806 (2nd)

Goals: 439 (2nd)

Points: 1,079 (2nd)

In his first two seasons, even on a team full of Hall of Fame talent, Jagr stood out as the ultimate game-breaker. Over the next decade, he terrorized defenses with a combination of size and skill the game has rarely seen. Has evolved into the game's venerable elder statesman.

• 4. Evgeni Malkin

2006-16

Games: 644 (7th)

Goals: 295 (6th)

Points: 760 (4th)

A dynamic offensive player with a penchant for taking over games, Malkin's trophy case alone tells the tale of his storied Penguins career – a Hart (league MVP), a Conn Smythe (playoff MVP), a Calder (rookie of the year) and two Art Ross trophies (leading scorer), not to mention a pair of Stanley Cup rings.

• 5. Paul Coffey

1987-92

Games: 331 (50th)

Goals: 108 (27th)

Points: 440 (11th)

Coffey was with the Penguins for less than five full seasons, but during that time, he put up offensive defenseman numbers that only Bobby Orr could touch in hockey history. Perhaps the finest skater to ever don black and gold, Coffey averaged 1.33 points per game during his Penguins tenure.

• 6. Marc-Andre Fleury

2003-16

Games: 653 (1st)

Wins: 357 (1st)

GAA: 2.56 (2nd)

Fleury has transformed from freak athlete to polished professional in his decade-plus with the club. His save on Nicklas Lidstrom at the end of Game 7 of the 2009 Stanley Cup Final will never be forgotten and his team records for wins and shutouts may never be broken.

• 7. Ron Francis

1990-98

Games: 533 (14th)

Goals: 164 (10th)

Points: 613 (6th)

Francis' 1991 arrival announced the Penguins as championship contenders for the first time. A rare breed of playmaking center who could keep up with Mario Lemieux and Jaromir Jagr on the scoresheet, Francis topped 100 points twice and 85 points three other times in seven full seasons with the team.

• 8. Kris Letang

2006-16

Games: 562 (12th)

Goals: 82 (32nd)

Points: 352 (18th)

Paul Coffey is the only defenseman in franchise history in Letang's league when it comes to explosiveness and offensive instincts. His workhorse performance at both ends of the rink in the 2016 playoffs only further boosted his reputation. Letang is No. 8 on this list with a bullet.

• 9. Larry Murphy

1990-95

Games: 336 (47th)

Goals: 78 (41st)

Points: 301 (24th)

Murphy was never the flashiest player on his team, but he brought a level of smarts and finesse that worked perfectly with the talented Penguins teams of the 1990s. His numbers speak for themselves. Murphy is fifth on the team's all-time list in defenseman points and first in plus-minus.

• 10. Tom Barrasso

1988-00

Games: 460 (2nd)

Wins: 226 (2nd)

GAA: 3.27 (10th)

The Penguins acquired Barrasso from Buffalo after efforts to trade for Andy Moog proved unsuccessful. That turned out to be a stroke of good fortune for the franchise, as the brash Barrasso was the perfect goaltender to play behind a team of high-octane stars in the 1990s.

• 11. Kevin Stevens

1987-02

Games: 522 (16th)

Goals: 260 (7th)

Points: 555 (8th)

The quintessential power forward whose bull-in-a-china-shop game meshed perfectly with Mario Lemieux, the 6-foot-3, 230-pound Stevens had a four-year run from 1990-94 unlike any other in team history. During that stretch, he piled up 190 goals, 408 points, 719 penalty minutes and two Stanley Cup rings.

• 12. Rick Kehoe

1974-85

Games: 722 (4th)

Goals: 312 (5th)

Points: 636 (5th)

Perhaps the most consistently dangerous shooter to ever play for the Penguins, Kehoe scored at least 27 goals in his first nine seasons with the team, including a 55-goal effort in 1980-81. Known to play the game with class, Kehoe won the Lady Byng Trophy that season as well.

• 13. Jean Pronovost

1968-78

Games: 753 (3rd)

Goals: 316 (4th)

Points: 603 (7th)

The finisher on the fabled Century Line, Pronovost set franchise records for games played and goals that seemed untouchable until Mario Lemieux came along. He was the first 50-goal scorer in franchise history and recorded at least 40 goals in four of his 10 seasons with the club.

• 14. Randy Carlyle

1978-84

Games: 397 (30th)

Goals: 66 (54th)

Points: 323 (22nd)

The Penguins have had a few Hall of Fame defensemen wear their jersey over the past five decades, but the only one to win the Norris Trophy as the NHL's best defenseman remains Carlyle, who had 83 points in 1980-81. He turned in three straight 10-goal seasons from 1981-83.

• 15. Mark Recchi

1988-2008

Games: 389 (32nd)

Goals: 154 (12th)

Points: 385 (13th)

In one of the greatest draft picks in team history, the Penguins chose Recchi in the fourth round in 1988. He went on to become one of the most relentless point producers to ever wear black and gold, topping the 30-goal mark in his first three seasons with the team and winning a championship in 1991.

• 16. Joe Mullen

1990-97

Games: 379 (35th)

Goals: 153 (13th)

Points: 325 (21st)

Mullen's arrival from Calgary in a 1990 trade was similar to the Phil Kessel deal in 2015. It gave the Penguins the kind of scoring depth they needed to be a championship contender. One of the most prolific American-born scorers of all-time, Mullen had three straight 30-goal seasons from 1991-94.

• 17. Syl Apps

1970-78

Games: 495 (18th)

Goals: 151 (14th)

Points: 500 (9th)

A second-generation star who could skate and handle the puck with the best of them, Apps joined Jean Pronovost and Lowell MacDonald on the famed Century Line. From 1972-76, the 1975 All-Star Game MVP never had fewer than 79 points, closing out the stretch with a 99-point season.

• 18. Rick Tocchet

1991-94

Games: 150 (138th)

Goals: 76 (45th)

Points: 179 (43rd)

Tocchet made a massive impression despite playing only about two full seasons with the Penguins, displaying a unique combination of fearsome physicality and goal-scoring touch. After sparking the team to the 1992 Stanley Cup, Tocchet had 48 goals, 109 points and 252 penalty minutes in a truly remarkable 1992-93 campaign.

• 19. Dave Burrows

1971-81

Games: 573 (10th)

Goals: 24 (111th)

Points: 132 (65th)

Perhaps the most underrated player in team history, Burrows was a defensive mainstay throughout the 1970s. Burrows wasn't offensive minded or physically intimidating, never topping 30 points or 60 penalty minutes in his eight seasons with the team, but he used his smarts and wonderful skating ability to shut down opponent after opponent.

• 20. Pierre Larouche

1974-78

Games: 240 (80th)

Goals: 119 (23rd)

Points: 253 (31st)

The Penguins have always been known as an offense-first outfit, and that really started to come into focus thanks to Larouche, a high-flying, French-Canadian superstar who predated Mario Lemieux's arrival by a decade. In 1975-76, he led the team with 53 goals and became the first 100-point scorer in franchise history.

• 21. Ulf Samuelsson

1990-95

Games: 277 (63rd)

Goals: 11 (196th)

Points: 94 (91st)

It's no wonder Samuelsson became one of the most popular players on the 1991-92 championship teams. He played the type of hard-hitting defense the city had enjoyed and appreciated for decades. His arrival in a 1991 trade from Hartford showed the Penguins wouldn't be pushed around anymore.

• 22. Brooks Orpik

2002-14

Games: 703 (6th)

Goals: 13 (177th)

Points: 132 (65th)

Named after former coach Herb Brooks, Orpik almost seemed destined to play for the Penguins. A first-round draft pick in 2000, he was a cornerstone of the team's defense corps for more than a decade, providing a punishing physical presence on the blue line for the 2009 championship team.

• 23. Sergei Gonchar

2005-10

Games: 322 (52nd)

Goals: 54 (61st)

Points: 259 (30th)

When Gonchar arrived as a free agent in 2005, he was exactly what the Penguins needed to vault themselves into title contention – a poised, experienced puck mover to work with the team's talented young forwards. Gonchar hit 50 points in all four of his full seasons with the team.

• 24. Chris Kunitz

2008-16

Games: 498 (17th)

Goals: 160 (11th)

Points: 359 (16th)

Kunitz's speed and hard-nosed style made him a perfect complement to Sidney Crosby, and he's quietly climbed the franchise's all-time leaderboard since arriving in a 2009 trade with Anaheim. By the end of this season, he will likely be among the team's all-time top 10 in goals and games played.

• 25. Martin Straka

1992-04

Games: 560 (13th)

Goals: 165 (9th)

Points: 442 (10th)

Along with Alexei Kovalev and Robert Lang, Straka was a member of the one of the most prolific lines the Penguins ever put together. The undersized forward used speed, smarts and skill to rank among the top 10 in franchise history in goals and points. Had two 80-point seasons.

• 26. Greg Malone

1976-83

Games: 495 (19th)

Goals: 143 (17th)

Points: 364 (14th)

To a generation of Penguins fans, Malone was known either as the team's head scout under Craig Patrick or as Ryan Malone's dad. In the 1970s, though, he made a name for himself as a playmaking center who put up at least 50 points in five of his seven seasons with the team.

• 27. Alexei Kovalev

1998-2011

Games: 365 (39th)

Goals: 151 (15th)

Points: 354 (17th)

Kovalev is probably the most gifted stickhandler to ever wear a Penguins jersey, and that's saying something given the team's star power over the years. The shackles were taken off his game when he arrived in Pittsburgh in 1998, and he responded with a 44-goal season two years later.

• 28. Robbie Brown

1987-2000

Games: 414 (28th)

Goals: 150 (16th)

Points: 342 (20th)

Brown's 49-goal season in 1988-89 is often cited as an example of what playing with Mario Lemieux could do for a player's production. That's unfair. Brown was one of the franchise's top natural-born goal scorers, and he reinvented himself as a grinder during a second stint with the team in the late 90s.

• 29. Ron Stackhouse

1973-82

Games: 621 (8th)

Goals: 66 (54th)

Points: 343 (19th)

Stackhouse was ahead of his time. He used his 6-foot-3 frame to move the puck, rather than deliver physical punishment to opponents, which hurt his popularity among fans at the Civic Arena. But make no mistake. He was the top offensive defenseman in team history before Paul Coffey came along.

• 30. Jordan Staal

2006-12

Games: 431 (25th)

Goals: 120 (22nd)

Points: 248 (32nd)

Every time the Penguins have won the Stanley Cup, they've done so thanks in part to a strong third line. Staal centering Matt Cooke and Tyler Kennedy in 2009 was as strong as it gets. Despite playing third fiddle on the center depth chart, Staal's stats stand out as well.

• 31. Bob Errey

1983-93

Games: 572 (11th)

Goals: 132 (19th)

Points: 272 (27th)

Using healthy doses of speed, smarts and sandpaper and more than a little skill, Errey was one of the most important unsung heroes of the first two championship teams in franchise history. From 1988-92, he turned in four straight seasons with at least 19 goals and 100 penalty minutes.

• 32. Pascal Dupuis

2007-16

Games: 452 (22nd)

Goals: 109 (26th)

Points: 247 (33rd)

Considered a throw-in in the trade that brought Marian Hossa to the Penguins, Dupuis became one of the most productive and beloved players in franchise history. His speed on the wing proved to be a perfect complement to Sidney Crosby until a blood-clotting condition put a premature halt to his career.

• 33. Darius Kasparaitis

1996-2002

Games: 405 (29th)

Goals: 15 (160th)

Points: 83 (102nd)

While he played for the New York Islanders for the first four years of his career, Kasparaitis was the player Penguins fans loved to hate. Once he donned black and gold, they just loved him. Kasparaitis was one of the most ferocious open-ice hitters in hockey history.

• 34. Lowell MacDonald

1970-78

Games: 328 (51st)

Goals: 140 (18th)

Points: 306 (23rd)

By the time MacDonald became a regular in the Penguins lineup in 1972, he had already undergone six surgeries to repair his ailing knees. Against all odds, he averaged 36 goals per season over the next four years, earning a spot on the famous Century Line with Jean Pronovost and Syl Apps.

• 35. Andy Bathgate

1967-71

Games: 150 (138th)

Goals: 35 (83rd)

Points: 103 (83rd)

Coming off an eight-goal season, having already turned 35, Bathgate was an afterthought when the Penguins chose him in the 19th round of the 1967 expansion draft. He had plenty of gas left in the tank, scoring the first goal in franchise history and leading the team in scoring during its inaugural season.

• 36. Ron Schock

1969-77

Games: 619 (9th)

Goals: 124 (20th)

Points: 404 (12th)

Far more dependable than he was flashy, Schock was good for around 15 goals and 50 points every year throughout the 1970s. He set a team record that stood for nearly four decades by playing 328 consecutive games and is among the franchise's top 20 all-time in goals and points.

• 37. John Cullen

1988-95

Games: 262 (67th)

Goals: 88 (34th)

Points: 272 (27th)

Cullen is perhaps best known for going to Hartford in the trade that brought back Ron Francis and Ulf Samuelsson, but he was a fast, feisty scorer who helped the Penguins grow into championship contenders in the early 1990s. He had back-to-back 30-goal seasons before being dealt to the Whalers.

• 38. Bryan Trottier

1990-94

Games: 156 (131st)

Goals: 24 (111th)

Points: 72 (107th)

Trottier was on the back nine of his Hall of Fame career when he joined the Penguins in 1990, but teammates credit his leadership and championship experience with helping the team get over the Stanley Cup hump. He filled the role of third-line center perfectly during the 1991 and 1992 playoff runs.

• 39. Michel Briere

1969-70

Games: 76 (259th)

Goals: 12 (190th)

Points: 44 (169th)

Small and shifty with a natural scorer's touch, Briere was third on the team in scoring as a rookie, netting the overtime goal that finished off a sweep of California in the first playoff series victory in franchise history. He was in a car accident two weeks after the season ended and died 11 months later.

• 40. Battleship Kelly

1973-77

Games: 250 (72nd)

Goals: 69 (49th)

Points: 154 (55th)

Kelly owns the unique distinction of not only being perhaps the toughest player in the franchise history, but also knowing how to use his hands with the gloves on. Kelly turned in back-to-back 25-goal seasons from 1974-76 and ranks among the top 50 goal scorers in team history.

• 41. Mike Bullard

1980-87

Games: 382 (34th)

Goals: 185 (8th)

Points: 360 (15th)

Bullard's time with the Penguins coincided with a period of great futility in the franchise's history, but he was a natural scorer who hit the 30-goal mark in four of his five full seasons with the team. He netted 51 goals in 1983-84, the year before Mario Lemieux was drafted.

• 42. Ryan Malone

2003-08

Games: 299 (57th)

Goals: 87 (36th)

Points: 169 (46th)

As the first player born and raised in Pittsburgh to play for the Penguins, Malone carved out a unique place in the franchise's history. Playing a power-forward style, the son of Greg Malone scored at least 20 goals in three of his four seasons with his hometown team.

• 43. Phil Kessel

2015-16

Games: 82 (241st)

Goals: 26 (102nd)

Points: 59 (133rd)

The speedy Kessel cracks the top 50 despite playing with the team for only one full season mostly on the strength of a legendary playoff performance. He led a Stanley Cup-winning team with 10 goals and 22 points in 24 playoff games, nearly claiming the Conn Smythe Trophy.

• 44. Ken Schinkel

1967-73

Games: 371 (37th)

Goals: 93 (31st)

Points: 236 (35th)

No player benefitted more from the birth of the Penguins than Schinkel. He spent 10 long years in the minor leagues before NHL expansion gave him his shot at the big time at age 34 in 1967-68. He became a cornerstone of the first six seasons in franchise history.

• 45. Les Binkley

1967-72

Games: 196 (5th)

Wins: 58 (6th)

GAA: 3.12 (8th)

The first player to sign a contract with the Penguins, Binkley was fan favorite during the first five seasons in franchise history. His job was a thankless one, the last line of defense behind an expansion lineup, and he often turned back a heavy volume of shots with his trademark kick save.

• 46. Max Talbot

2005-11

Games: 388 (33rd)

Goals: 52 (64th)

Points: 108 (80th)

The energetic Talbot turned in perhaps the best big-game performance in franchise history, scoring both Penguins goals in a 2-1 victory over Detroit in Game 7 of the 2009 Stanley Cup Final. Shushing the Philadelphia crowd after a fight with Daniel Carcillo three rounds earlier didn't hurt his standing among the fanbase either.

• 47. James Neal

2010-14

Games: 199 (102nd)

Goals: 89 (32nd)

Points: 184 (42nd)

Neal's legacy suffers from the fact that all his seasons with the Penguins ended in playoff disappointment, but that doesn't mean he isn't one of the most dangerous scorers in franchise history. He is one of just five Penguins players to record a 40-goal season since the turn of the century.

• 48. Paul Gardner

1980-84

Games: 207 (95th)

Goals: 98 (30th)

Points: 203 (39th)

The first Penguins player to score four goals in a game, Gardner was one of the best in franchise history at getting pucks past goaltenders in close quarters around the crease. He scored no fewer than 28 goals in three seasons with the team just before the Mario Lemieux era began.

• 49. Phil Bourque

1983-92

Games: 344 (45th)

Goals: 75 (46th)

Points: 164 (52nd)

The quintessential role player who did the dirty work on teams full of stars, Bourque was beloved by fans for his blue-collar approach and hard-hitting style during the first two Stanley Cup seasons in franchise history. He cracked 20 goals and 100 penalty minutes in back-to-back seasons from 1989-91.

• 50. Matt Murray

2015-16

Games: 13 (40th)

Wins: 9 (33rd)

GAA: 2.00 (1st)

Despite playing only a handful of regular-season games in his young career, Murray has already left an indelible mark on the franchise's history. Stepping in for an injured Marc-Andre Fleury, the unflappable Murray carried the Penguins to the team's fourth Stanley Cup last season, never once losing back-to-back starts.

HONORABLE MENTION

FORWARDS: Pat Boutette ,Randy Cunneyworth, George Ferguson, Bill Guerin, Vic Hadfield, Bryan Hextall, Orest Kindrachuk, Robert Lang, Peter Lee, Troy Loney, Peter Mahovlich, Al McDonough, Petr Nedved, Dan Quinn, Tomas Sandstrom, Rod Schutt, Eddie Shack, Doug Shedden

DEFENSEMEN: Russ Anderson, Paul Baxter, Doug Bodger, Kevin Hatcher, Randy Hillier, Moe Mantha, Paul Martin, Kjell Samuelsson, Rob Scuderi, Bryan Watson, Ryan Whitney, Zarley Zalapski

GOALIES: Denis Herron, Ken Wregget

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