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Penguins notebook: Ryan Reaves will rest easier with long road trips finished

Jonathan Bombulie
| Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, 8:55 p.m.
Penguins winger Ryan Reaves plays against the Golden Knights Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Penguins winger Ryan Reaves plays against the Golden Knights Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
Dallas Stars right wing Tyler Pitlick (18) has his shot deflected back between his legs by Penguins goalie Matt Murray (30) during the first period of an NHL hockey game Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Dallas.
Dallas Stars right wing Tyler Pitlick (18) has his shot deflected back between his legs by Penguins goalie Matt Murray (30) during the first period of an NHL hockey game Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Dallas.

DALLAS — The Penguins' current road trip, with stops in Dallas on Friday night and in St. Louis on Sunday afternoon, is the last time they will leave the Eastern time zone in the regular season.

For some players on the roster, that's not really a big deal. NHL teams travel in relative luxury, so the difference in wear and tear between a two-and-a-half hour flight to Dallas and a one-hour flight to New Jersey is minimal.

For other players, it's very good news.

Take winger Ryan Reaves, for example.

“I have a very bad problem sleeping after games,” said Reaves, who estimated he nods off at about 4:30 a.m. after the average home game.

Time changes make the problem even worse.

“I feel like my adrenaline kicks in so much during games that it takes me so long,” Reaves said. “I can go to bed and try to go to sleep at 12, but I know if I do that, I'm going to sit there restless and now I'm going to be up until 6 in the morning. I don't even go to bed until I know my body is starting to calm down a little bit.”

Quick healer

Winger Conor Sheary was in the lineup Friday night after missing just three games with a lower-body injury. He started on the third line with Zach Aston-Reese and Riley Sheahan.

“The original results kind of showed that it looked like it was going to be worse,” Sheary said. “Just from what I was feeling and what the doctor said, he came to the conclusion that it wasn't that bad. It kept me out for 10 days or so. It could have been a lot worse.”

Pittsburgh dad

As the fathers of players accompanied the team on its current road trip, at least one Penguins dad is used to being surrounded by black and gold.

Zach Aston-Reese's father, Will, is a Crafton native. He grew up in the Pittsburgh neighborhood before going to college at Millersville, moving to Queens and meeting Aston-Reese's mother, who is from Staten Island.

Jonathan Bombulie is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at jbombulie@tribweb.com or via Twitter @BombulieTrib.

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