Share This Page

Crosby, Penguins dominate Devils for first home win

| Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, 3:36 p.m.
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Robert Bortuzzo smiles after scoring his first NHL goal during the third period against New Jersey Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Sidney Crosby celebrates his goal during the third period against New Jersey Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury makes a goal save on a shot by the Devils' Ryan Carter during the second period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Kris Letang (58) celebrates his goal with Chris Kunitz and Evgeni Malkin during the third period against New Jersey Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Sidney Crosby celebrates his goal with Pascal Dupuis and Chris Kunitz during the third period against New Jersey Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Brandon Sutter (right) celebrates his goal against the Devils during the second period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury makes a save on the Devils' Steve Bernier during the second period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur makes a save next to the Penguins' Sidney Crosby during the first period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
New Jersey's Andy Greene scores past Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury during the second period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins celebrate a goal by Chris Kunitz (14) next to Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur during the second period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Brandon Sutter scores against New Jersey during the second period Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
The Penguins' Sidney Crosby celebrates his goal during the third period against New Jersey Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Consol Energy Center. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review

There was little style at Consol Energy Center on Saturday.

Just substance. Lots of substance.

In a workmanlike and nearly flawless performance, the Penguins dominated the Devils, 5-1.

The Penguins have spoken adamantly for the better part of two weeks regarding their desire to simplify their game, playing a more honest style instead of relying on their superior talent.

On Saturday, they finally showcased such a performance.

“The way we got them (five goals) is more indicative of how we played,” coach Dan Bylsma said. “It wasn't a free-wheeling game. It wasn't chance for chance. I thought we did a really good job of playing the offensive zone, putting the pucks in areas, going to work. We got rewarded.”

The Penguins have been burned by their habit of preferring the perfect play in the early going, especially at home. Their goals against the Devils told a different story, perhaps evidence that the Penguins have toned down their attack.

• The Penguins took a 1-0 lead when Brandon Sutter and Sidney Crosby barged to the net and whacked at a loose puck before it finally caromed over New Jersey goalie Martin Brodeur. Sutter received the goal, his first with the Penguins. There was nothing fancy about it.

• Kris Letang's goal in the third period gave the Penguins a 4-1 lead. Evgeni Malkin and Chris Kunitz ferociously forechecked on the play, forcing a Henrik Tallinder turnover. A moment later, Letang produced his second goal of the season.

• On the Penguins' final goal, Crosby outworked Krystofer Barch behind the net, ultimately stripping him of the puck and finding Robert Bortuzzo for his first NHL goal.

• The other two goals — Crosby's rocket on a two-on-one and Kunitz's gift after a turnover from New Jersey defenseman Anton Volchenkov — were also plays that developed because of the Penguins creating a turnover.

“We need to do more of that,” Crosby said. “Part of it is that we came with more speed through the neutral zone. And part of that is keeping the puck away from (Brodeur). He's so good handling the puck. We just did the job today.”

The performance can't be labeled as perfect, not when the Penguins failed to score on three power-play opportunities and permitted a league-leading second short-handed goal.

Still, it marked a step in the right direction.

Having allowed scoring opportunities in bunches at home, the Penguins held the Devils to 16 shots. The game was similar to two March performances last season that saw the Penguins beat the Devils, 5-2, on each occasion.

“They're a heck of a hockey team,” New Jersey forward David Clarkson said. “They do a lot of good things. They're fast, they pressure you when you're in the other team's zone, you have no time. We didn't play our best, and they were great today.”

The Penguins dominated in the faceoff circle (34-21), shots (30-16) and hits (23-17).

Crosby scored his fourth goal and produced two primary assists for his first three-point game of the season. Kunitz also earned a goal and two assists. Crosby and Kunitz were each a plus-4.

The Penguins (5-3-0) play Sunday in Washington (2-5-1).

“We did so many things well today,” Bortuzzo said. “I just feel like we played the right way.”

Josh Yohe is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at jyohe@tribweb.com or via Twitter @JoshYohe_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.