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Burkle makes bid to buy NBA's Kings

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Friday, March 1, 2013, 8:57 p.m.
 

Ron Burkle is trying to save another professional team.

Burkle, a California multibillionaire and Penguins majority co-owner, is part of a group attempting to keep the NBA's Kings in Sacramento, Calif. Another group is trying to buy the Kings and relocate the franchise to Seattle, which lost its NBA team in 2008.

Burkle and partner Mark Mastrov, founder of 24 Hour Fitness, officially bid for the Kings on Friday, NBA spokesman Tim Frank said.

The NHL has “no issue” with Burkle's role in pursuing the Kings, deputy commissioner Bill Daly told the Tribune-Review on Friday night.

Burkle partnered with Mario Lemieux to purchase the Penguins from bankruptcy in 1999.

Lemieux said in January he would have no role in Burkle's NBA business dealings. Burkle would keep his keep his share in the Penguins.

Burkle would lead an effort to build a downtown arena in Sacramento.

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell said Burkle played the pivotal role on the Penguins side to securing funding for Consol Energy Center during negotiations with state, county and city officials in late 2006 and early 2007.

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