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Crosby's goal reminiscent of Lemieux's 'statue' goal

| Thursday, May 9, 2013, 10:30 p.m.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Sidney Crosby sbreaks away from the Islanders' Thomas Hickey and Lubomir Visnovsky to score during the second period Thursday, May 9, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.

Sidney Crosby already has a golden goal.

Now, the Penguins captain has one that belongs in bronze.

When Crosby split New York Islanders defensemen Lubomir Visnovsky and Thomas Hickey at the blue line and beat Evgeni Nabokov in the Penguins' 4-0 Game 5 victory Thursday night, it was reminiscent of the Mario Lemieux goal immortalized in a statue outside the Trib Total Media gate at Consol Energy Center.

The statue, sculpted by Bruce Wolfe and unveiled in March 2012, depicts Lemieux in a moment captured on the cover of Sports Illustrated. He split Islanders defensemen Rich Pilon and Jeff Norton before beating goaltender Kelly Hrudey in a 5-3 victory Dec. 20, 1988.

Crosby downplayed comparisons of his goal to that of Le Magnifique.

“Not one bit,” said Crosby, whose “golden goal” came when he scored the game-winner against Team USA in overtime to lead Canada to the gold medal at the Vancouver Olympics. “His was much nicer than mine. He went through guys, stick-handled through them and stick-handled around the goalie, too. I had a few less moves and a pretty basic shot. I'll take the goal no matter how it goes in.”

Immediately after Crosby's goal, “#statue” was trending on Twitter, and the Penguins tweeted video of both of them.

“I think everyone has seen that,” Crosby said of Lemieux's goal. “That didn't even cross my mind to be honest with you.”

— Kevin Gorman

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