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Senators notebook: Big cheers for little hero Pageau

| Sunday, May 19, 2013, 9:42 p.m.

Big cheers for little hero

Ottawa fans keep chanting his name (“Pageau, Pageau, Pageau” to the tune of “Ole, Ole, Ole”). Jean-Gabriel Pageau has become a local hero.

From neighboring Gatineau, Pageau stands 5-foot-9 and weighs 163 pounds.

He got his call to play in Ottawa after starting the season as a fourth-liner in the minors.

“People always told me I was too small,” said Pageau. “You just have to keep believing, give everything you have every day and good things can happen.”

No goalie controversy

In the wake of Craig Anderson being yanked on the third of Sidney Crosby's goals Friday night, Senators coach Paul MacLean had zero thoughts about keeping Anderson out of the Ottawa net Sunday. His faith was rewarded early and often, with Anderson keeping the Senators in the game, his shutout intact until Tyler Kennedy's goal late in the second period.

Turris stepped up

Kyle Turris was one player who benefited from Jason Spezza's absence, with increased playing time and greater responsibility. “I learned how to be a first-line center,” said Turris. “It has been a great learning experience. Some nights I did well, other nights not so well. The guys took a lot of pressure off me.”

Erik not so great

Senators defenseman Erik Karlsson, who has struggled at times since his return from a severed Achilles tendon, is still looking for his Norris Trophy-winning form. “I've been frustrated, but now is not the time to be frustrated. I have to drop it. No matter what happens now, I can reflect on that when the season is over.”

— Tim Baines

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