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Senators notebook: MacLean impressed by Ottawa fans

| Monday, May 20, 2013, 7:18 p.m.

Ottawa Senators coach Paul MacLean's NHL playing days had stops in Winnipeg, Detroit and St. Louis. Detroit, often called Hockeytown, is among his coaching stops. MacLean said the enthusiasm of Ottawa fans takes a backseat to nobody.

“The fans are great,” he said. “In and around the city, you can't go anywhere ... there's a buzz. It's every bit as exciting as Hockeytown has ever been, maybe even more. In a Canadian city, it's way different than being in a U.S. city in the Stanley Cup playoffs. It's a lot of fun right now.”

Sens' captain up for award

Senators captain Daniel Alfredsson is a finalist — along with Los Angeles' Dustin Brown and Chicago's Jonathan Toews — for the Mark Messier Leadership award, presented to the player who “exemplifies great leadership qualities to his team, on and off the ice during the regular season.”

Time on Pens' side

An interesting stat from sportsnet.ca's Ian Mendes: Total time playing with the lead in this series: Penguins, 124:45; Ottawa, 0:00. Impressive, yes, but the series is still only 2-1 in the Penguins' favor and the Senators are gaining confidence.

No answers on Neil

There was no update available on the status of Senators winger Chris Neil, who left Sunday's game in the second period after injuring his left arm crashing into the boards. “I haven't seen him (today),” said MacLean. “As far as I know, he's still not available.”

Dancing with the stars

Evgeni Malkin was at his dancing best during parts of Sunday's game, but he couldn't find the net. “He's a great player, he danced around a couple of guys in overtime,” said Senators goalie Craig Anderson. “He's the type of player who's a gamebreaker. I thought we did a really good job of eliminating his quality scoring chances.”

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