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Penguins notebook: Gibbons returns to lineup vs. Sabres

| Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, 10:51 p.m.

• Sidney Crosby had a quick answer for what Brian Gibbons brings as a linemate. “Speed. Lots of speed,” the Penguins' captain said. “He creates a lot with that.” Gibbons returned to the lineup Monday against the Sabres after missing the previous five games because of a lower-body injury. He also was immediately inserted onto the top line to the right wing of Crosby and left wing Chris Kunitz. “It's pretty easy to fit in well with those guys,” said Gibbons, who termed himself at 100 percent after the morning skate. “They're really smart and consistent the way they play, so you always know where they're going to be. So you just try to work hard and use your speed and get to lose pucks and stuff like that.” Gibbons spent time on Crosby's line after Pascal Dupuis' season-ending knee injury Dec. 23. With an assist Monday, Gibbons has two goals and five assists in 14 games.

• Four days after being re-assigned to the AHL, Zach Sill was back in Pittsburgh on Monday. But it wasn't for a reason he'd want to be. After being cut in the arm by a skate late in Saturday night's game for the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins, Sill was in Pittsburgh to be evaluated by a specialist. Early Monday afternoon, Penguins coach Dan Bylsma said that examination had not yet taken place. He didn't speculate on the severity of Sill's injury. The 25-year-old Sill made his NHL debut this season and appeared to be establishing a niche for himself as a bottom-six forward for the Penguins in 20 games with the team.

• The Penguins have turned to Jayson Megna as they search for production from their third line. Megna, who had four goals in his first 19 NHL games this season, was on the Penguins' third line with Brandon Sutter and Taylor Pyatt on Monday.

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