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Stats corner: Crosby cruising to another scoring title

| Sunday, March 30, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

The Art Ross Trophy is named after the legendary Boston Bruins coach and general manager, but the award's true home is Pittsburgh. Penguins center Sidney Crosby has all but locked up his second regular-season scoring title, building a 17-point lead over Anaheim's Ryan Getzlaf that would be the largest margin of victory since Jaromir Jagr bested Teemu Selanne by 20 points during the 1998-99 season.

Despite the franchise being founded two decades after the award was established in 1947-48, the Pens will have collected an NHL-best 15 Art Ross trophies once Crosby's title becomes official. That's six more than the second-place Canadiens and far ahead of other “Original Six” clubs including the Blackhawks, Bruins and Red Wings.

Crosby's raw points per game total (1.32) is plenty impressive. But it's even better considering the paucity of scoring in today's era of supersized goalies, shrunken nets and suffocating defensive schemes.

His adjusted points-per-game figure, which factors in league-wide scoring, roster size and schedule length, is 1.60. That tops Crosby's other Art Ross-winning season in 2006-07 (1.54 adjusted points), and matches up well with Evgeni Malkin's wins in 2011-12 (1.63 per game) and 2008-09 (1.43).

Crosby will need to go on a scoring binge to crack the top five in single-season adjusted points among all Pens' Art Ross Trophy winners:

Player Season Adj. Pts/G

Jaromir Jagr 1994-95 2.52

Mario Lemieux 1995-96 2.23

Mario Lemieux 1988-89 2.17

Mario Lemieux 1992-93 2.15

Mario Lemieux 1987-88 1.83

David Golebiewski is a freelance writer.

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