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Penguins fall to Senators in shootout in regular-season finale

| Sunday, April 13, 2014, 10:33 p.m.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Senators' Mark Stone celebrates Kyle Turris' second-period goal against the Penguins on Sunday, April 13, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Tanner Glass and the Senators' Chris Neil fight in the first period Sunday, April 13, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Kris Letang deflects the puck away from the Senators' Jean-Gabriel Pageau in the second period Sunday, April 13, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Penguins goaltender Jeff Zatkoff makes a second-period save as the Senators' Erik Condra screens Zatkoff on Sunday, April 13, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins’ Jussi Jokinen (left), James Neal (middle) and Kris Letang celebrate Jokinen’s second-period goal against the Senators on Sunday, April 13, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.

What has amounted to a series of exhibition games for the Penguins is finally over.

Now, it's playoff time.

The Penguins fell to the Ottawa Senators, 3-2, in a shootout on Sunday at Consol Energy Center, finishing with their second highest point total (109) in franchise history.

Kyle Turris and Jason Spezza scored in the shootout for Ottawa, which was eliminated from playoff contention last week.

The Penguins had known since Saturday night they would play the Columbus Blue Jackets in the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs.

Jussi Jokinen and Lee Stempniak scored for the Penguins, who were playing without centers Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and Brandon Sutter and defenseman Matt Niskanen.

Ottawa got goals from Turris and forward Mark Stone.

Jokinen's goal came with a man-advantage, which helped the Penguins finish with the NHL's top power play. They finished with a 23.4 conversion rate.

In what has become an annual tradition, the Penguins remained on the ice following the game to give selected fans their sweaters.

Coach Dan Bylsma said after Saturday's game against Philadelphia that his playoff lineup remains uncertain and spots still could be available among the bottom six forwards.

Players who could be competing for playing time include Harry Zolnierczyk, Brian Gibbons, Jayson Megna and Taylor Pyatt. Each of them played Sunday.

Although most of the game lacked emotion, the Penguins' Tanner Glass and Ottawa's Chris Neil engaged in a first-period fight. Glass got the better of Neil in an otherwise meaningless game.

Josh Yohe is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at jyohe@tribweb.com or via Twitter @JoshYohe_Trib.

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