Share This Page

Personality Test: Pirates announcer Greg Brown

Greg Brown is in his 18th season as a radio and television play-by-play announcer with the Pirates. He started in 1979 as an intern in the promotions department while attending Point Park College. He was the clubhouse manager during the Instructional League program in Bradenton, Fla., and worked in sales, public relations and broadcasting departments for the Pirates front office.

Prior to joining the broadcast team in 1994, he spent five seasons doing play-by-play and color commentary for the Buffalo Bisons of the American Association (now International League) and hosting a sports-talk show on WGR Radio. Brown worked as a color analyst and a pre-and post-game show host for the Buffalo Bills of the NFL for five seasons.

With the Pirates, he spearheaded the "Gloves for Kids" program which raised money for much-needed equipment and gloves for youth baseball and softball organizations in underserved areas around Pittsburgh.

A native of Washington, D.C., Brown resides in Leet Township with his wife Kim and son Ryan.

The star who would play me in the movie version of my life and why:

Kurt Russell. I like him, and think he is the best and most underrated actor.

Childhood hero and why:

Walter Payton. I was a huge Chicago Bears fan growing up, and I loved the way he ran the football.

The piece of memorabilia from my childhood I wish I still had.

Chicago Bears mini-helmet radio.

I can't live without my: iPod, cell phone, DVR, or laptop•

My Blackberry. The bad thing is people can reach you anytime.

Best game I've ever broadcast and why:

The final game at Three Rivers Stadium. Carrick native John Wehner hit an impressive go-ahead home run. And the 1993 Buffalo Bills wildcard playoff game where they came back from a 32-point halftime deficit.

Pick one:

A. Pirates

B. Penguins

C. Steelers

D. Other

E. I hate sports

A. Seriously• Pirates. That's an easy one.

My favorite thing about Pittsburgh is:

The skyline. From my vantage point in the press box, it is a most beautiful scene that I get to see on a nightly basis. This city to me is my "OZ." When you drive through the tunnel and see it, it takes your breath away.

Three people I'd love to have dinner with:

George W. Bush, Ann Coulter and Steve Blass

Celebrity crush:

Sharon Corr. She is part of an Irish folk rock band. She plays the violin and sings.

When I was 10, I wanted to be:

A major league baseball player. I wasn't the best athlete, but when I was a kid, I would announce the games we played while we were playing them. That was where I discovered my love of broadcasting.

The best concert I've ever seen:

I might be showing my age, but Michael Jackson at the Civic Arena in 1988. He put on an incredible show. He was a great entertainer.

The person I'm most often mistaken for:

My brother Charlie. He is an attorney Downtown and he often walks the street and people call him by my name, and some people see me and call me Charlie.

In high school, I was:

A nerd ... and I still am to this day!

The movie that always makes me cry:

"It's a Wonderful Life," which is about friendship and helping a person in need. And "Brian's Song." That is a real tearjerker.

What you'll always find in my glove compartment:

Napkins, because I spill things everywhere!

If I wasn't a Pirates broadcaster, I'd be:

Unhappy. I love what I do!

The last book I read:

"Sins of the Fathers," by James Scott Bell

Movie I could watch every time it appears on cable:

"Tombstone"

My favorite website:

www.pirates.com

My childhood nickname was:

Point Head. My father shaved my head, and I had a point on my head that you could see.

My favorite "bad" movie is:

"Caddyshack"

My first job:

Cleaning out horse stalls in Mechanicsburg

My worst job:

Cleaning out horse stalls in Mechanicsburg

My favorite cable channel:

ROOT Sports, MLB package, C-Span and Discovery

Life would be better without:

People who think they are better than others just because of the jobs they have or the money they make.

I never travel without my:

Scorebook. I don't know what I would do without it. It's my security blanket.

People would be surprised to know that I:

Was a high school classmate of John Fedko and a college classmate of Bob Pompeani.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.